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The ultimate guide to protecting credit in a freelance and gig economy

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The ultimate guide to protecting credit in a freelance and gig economyA nontraditional career path requires a financial planBy Tamara E. Holmes  |  Updated: April 20, 2018Being a freelancer or your own boss in the gig economy may sound like a great deal, but without proper planning, a freelancing lifestyle can turn into a credit disaster. Approximately 57.3 Americans – 36 percent of the U.S. workforce – do some type of freelancing, according to a 2017 study by Upwork and Freelancer’s Union. A whopping 47 percent of working millennials freelance, and by 2027, the majority of the U.S. workforce will consist of freelancers, the study found.  When you make a living doing freelance assignments, temporary jobs or consulting work, you get flexible hours, and may even be able to work from anywhere. The appeal is far-reaching. Nearly 40 percent of Americans said they would prefer being a gig worker to holding a full-time job, according to a 2016 survey by global workforce solutions adviser Staffing Industry Analysts.But the freedom and flexibility can come at a cost. Maintaining a good credit score and having credit readily available can become more difficult, and a nonsteady paycheck can leave you teetering on the edge of financial ruin. If you’re thinking about joining the gig economy, be proactive to protect your finances and maintain a good credit score while pursuing a nontraditional career.Read more
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Top 10 Reasons to Volunteer or Intern Abroad

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While each individual pursuing an international volunteer or internship position may have their unique reasons for taking the leap, everyone on this path can enjoy several key benefits. Unlike domestic internships and volunteer roles, traveling overseas opens participants to new ways of seeing the world and interacting with others – not to mention the opportunity to build new skills and global contacts.https://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/college-resource-center/volunteering-internships-abroad/
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Public Art Resources

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This list of resources has been put together specifically for attendees of the 2016 Art in Public Spaces info session + panel discussion. If you have any questions please contact Angela@fresharts.orgCall for Artists websitesPublicArtist.org CallForEntry.orgArt Deadline  Fresh Arts OpportunitiesArtist Insurance & Legal ResourcesFractured Atlas Public Art InsuranceFractured Atlas provides Public Art Insurance policies for the fabrication and installation of public artworks. It offers general liability coverage for the artist during the fabrication, installation, and/or the exhibition of the work. You can elect to cover the artwork itself as well.Insurance in the Arts - Virtual Pocket GuidesWelcome to your one stop resource for crash courses in insurance for the arts, specific to the needs of your discipline. Brought to you by Fractured Atlas, a national nonprofit arts service organization, these guides are designed to give you exactly the information you need to help determine the most important types of insurance coverage for you and your organization without being overwhelming.Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Arts Pro-bono ServicesTALA matches low-income artists and small budget arts nonprofits with volunteer attorneys and accountants to assist with arts-related legal and financial matters.Local Organization linksHouston Arts Alliance Civic + Art DesignWeingarten Art GroupMayor's Office of Cultural AffairsFresh Arts Fiscal Sponsorship ProgramTexas Public Art Opps (thanks to our friends at HAA for this list)City of Austin, Art In Public Places Program / Austin, TXCity of San Antonio, Public Art San Antonio / San Antonio, TXCity of San Antonio, Department for Culture & Creative Development / San Antonio, TXCity of Corpus Christi, Public Art Program / Corpus Christi, TXCity of El Paso, Public Art Program / El Paso, TXArts Council of Fort Worth & Tarrant County, Fort Worth Public Art / Fort Worth, TXCity of Dallas, Public Art Program / Dallas, TXTexas Commission on the Arts / TXWhere can you find public art in Houston? (hint: everywhere!)East End Cultural District The Downtown District: Art BlocksMini-Murals ProjectProject Row Houses Rice University Public ArtTrue North / True South / Trail of Art  (Heights Boulevard)University of Houston Public Art collectionWashington Avenue Arts DistrictOnline Readings (recommended by Americans for the Arts)Minding your RFP’s and Q’s by Elizabeth Keithline, ARTSblogCopyrights & Copywrongs: A Quick Overview of Basic Issues by Clark Wiegman, ARTSblogCreating, Collaborating, Connecting with Art, Activism, and the Internet by Xavier Cortada, ARTSblogPublic Art Creates an Elevated Mood by Helen Lessick, ARTSblogGuerilla Tactics, Local Authenticity, and Socially Engaged Artists by Letitia Fernandez Ivins, ARTSblogArtists Evaluating Their Own Public Art by Lajos Heder, ARTSblogChanging Art, Changing Habits by Bill Mackey, ARTSblogWhy Public Art is Good for All Artists by Cathy Breslaw, ARTSblogWorking on a Public Site by Lajos Heder, ARTSblogPublic Art: Reconsidering Site by Cher Knight and Harriet Senie, ARTSblog
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What is the difference between domains vs hosting vs website? (HostGator)

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Courtesy of HostGator-----When you have a site visitor, they use your domain name to view your website. As simple as it seems, there is a process that occurs from the time that the site visitor types in your domain and presses enter.When a site visitor enters your domain name into a browser, the domain is then translated into your server IP address,  then the server sends that user your site files, which their browser represents to them as a typical web-page.You can see that, without each of these 3 elements, you won't really have a web-site.The three basic parts that make up any current day website are:Domain NamesComputers communicate by using numbers, called IP addresses, to contact each other, much like you use a phone number to dial a specific person's phone. Domain names on the internet are much like entries in a phone book. The phone book tells people looking for a business what the entries are just as a domain tells people (i.e. their computers) that a domain is hosted on the server.Without a domain, you would have to tell your customers that your site is located at a temporary url such as 123.456.789.123/~mysite instead of using a domain name such as mysite.com, making your site appear unprofessional and impractical.Web-Hosting ServersThe web-hosting or server is much like the space that you rent out to have your business in. It's merely the space itself. It does not include furnishings like shelves for your products, just as the web-hosting account doesn't include a site for you to sell your products.Luckily, in the web-hosting world, it's very easy to furnish the space provided by your host, because you can install many framework applications through the QuickInstall icon within your cPanel.Without the hosting services, you won't have a place for your files to reside, so your domain would then become like a disconnected phone number in the phone directory, and your site files would have nowhere to stay.Site FilesThe site files are what your visitors and potential customers actually see when going to site such as your products and services. The site files are the same as any other file you normally use, like a .jpg photograph, or .mp3 music file. Though, website files are also .php files or .html files, which are PHP scripts or html pages respectively.The web-hosting server knows how to read these files, which explain how the webpage looks or instruct the server to do a series of computations. These computations are things like figuring out what blog article it's supposed to send back to the viewer, or what forum post it's supposed to send back.. . . continue reading on HostGator
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Successful Art and Artist Websites Do's and Don'ts: How to Build a Website that Works (ArtBusiness.com)

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Courtesy of Alan B at ArtBusiness.com-----The mantra for a successful art or artist website has been and continues to be "Keep it fast, simple, easy and organized." Navigation and content must be straightforward in order to attract visitors in the first place and keep them on the site once they get there. First-time visitors to any artist website should know as quickly as possible where they are, who the artist is, what their art looks like, what it's about, why it's worth seeing (and hopefully worth buying), and how to move around in order to get wherever they want to go. Sites that lack these basics or make other common errors won't be able to attract and hold visitors, and will likely end up lost in the vast morass of nonfunctional and confusing art websites that overpopulate the Internet.Before we get going here, and in the interest of you who think artist websites are no longer necessary, that having a social networking presence is all you need, the sad truth is you have no control over your content on social networking sites because they're the ones in charge, not you. They can change the rules at any time, remove posts they deem inappropriate, become outdated, disappear off the Internet, completely change direction, or at worst, kick you off altogether. Regardless of how fabulous you think social networking is or how large your following, YOUR WEBSITE IS THE ONLY PLACE ONLINE WHERE YOU CONTROL THE SHOW and no one else. You and only you decide what to post, when to post it, how long it stays there, when to change it, where to put it, when to move it or when to take it down. You can gamble all you want on social networking, but always remember-- having your own website is a sure bet you never lose. So in the interest of better artist websites everywhere, here's a list of what to do and what to avoid in order to assure yourself maximum visibility and an effective web presence online:Get your own domain name and avoid free web hosting services. Free web hosting is never free and it's always lame. "Free" websites torture visitors with all kinds of distracting advertisements or other obtrusive text and graphics. At worst, maybe half of the screen shows your art while the other half, controlled by the host site, looks like a circus. Your art often ends up in direct competition with all kinds of commercial crap and hardly any art looks good under those circumstances. Furthermore, free sites give the impression that either you can't afford your own website or domain name or worse yet, that you don't care enough about your art to bother buying your own domain in order to make it look its best online. The good news is that basic websites with good functionality hardly cost anything these days.Don't use third-party advertising on your sites, especially for goods or services unrelated to your art. Sure, you may make a little pocket change from click-throughs, but any advertising is distracting to visitors and your art will suffer for it.Make sure your website looks the same on Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Firefox and Safari. The same website can look great on one browser and terrible on another, or worse yet, work on one browser but be completely nonfunctional on another. Test yours on all major browsers before going public.Your website should also be mobile-friendly. More and more people are browsing the web on mobile devices, and the number is only increasing. You want your art and website to look its best no matter how people are viewing it..... . . CONTINUE reading at ArtBusiness.com(img source)
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Web Portfolio 101 - The Basics (Columba College)

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Courtesy of Columbia College from Portfolio Center-----Of all the things a web site may be, a web portfolio is a curated selection of work that provides an overview of your creative experience. It basically tells someone how you want to be understood. A web portfolio can also serve as your main communication hub where the rest of your online presence branches out from.We encourage every student at Columbia to have a web portfolio (yes, that means you, too, ASL and education students!). You don’t have to know how to code, or know what a content management system (CMS) is to make a web portfolio.To get started, you’ll want to get:1. a website hosting system.2. a custom domain name....View complete resource (along with tutorial VIDEO) at Columbia College Portfolio Center website
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Text Based Portfolios (Columbia College)

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Courtesy of Colombia College Chicago-----Journalists, arts/entertainment/media managers and marketing/PR reps should not represent themselves with papers and press releases stuffed into a manila folder.  Potential clients and employers expect a professional, organized, and visually appealing representation of your best work.  The following guide will sketch out the elements and organization for a text-based print book.  Samples are provided to demonstrate that text heavy content can be displayed in a visually appealing and accessible way A text based print book should be:ProfessionalOrganizedEasy to navigateEasy to reproduce . . . View entire article with diagrams on Columbia College Portfolio Center website
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Art Schools and Degrees Database (Accredited Schools Online)

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Visit Accredited Schools Online: Best Art Schools and Colleges
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The Delightfully Short Guide to Social Media ROI (BufferSocial)

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If the concept of social media ROI feels rather enormous, you’re not alone. I am amazed—and sometimes astounded—at the breadth of the topic.So that’s made the exercise of writing a “delightfully short” guide to social media ROI all the more fun and challenging. I’ve given myself under 1,000 words to provide an overview of social media ROI and how to apply it to your social media marketing efforts. What Does Social Media ROI Look Like?ROI has its roots in business finance. Businesses use ROI to calculate the dollars-and-cents return on a dollars-and-cents investment.Social media ROI is what you get back from all the time, effort, and resources you commit to social. And it’s best calculated with dollar amounts.Of course, there are no dollar signs dangling from retweets or likes. Twitter, Facebook, and others are no-cost marketing channels to join, potentially a zero-dollar investment (which makes any return exponentially fantastic, right!). So in order to track ROI, the key elements would be:Identifying your monetary investment in social mediaAttaching a dollar amount to your social media goals.Difficult? Possibly.Possible? Definitely.View full article 
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Harris Health System: Access Care

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ACCESS CAREAs the community-owned healthcare system for the nation's third most populous county, we deliver fully integrated healthcare services to a broad cross section of Harris County residents. Some of our patients are funded by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance, but many are among the 1.2 million Harris County residents who are uninsured or underinsured.During fiscal year 2014, we leveraged $516.0 million in tax-base support into $1.577.9 billion of charity care, delivering a level of quality that rivals top-notch private institutions. In fact, Harris Health System boasts numerous centers of clinical excellence that are among the best in the nation.https://www.harrishealth.org/en/patients/access-care/pages/default.aspx
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Houston, TX 77266-6494


713.868.1839


Fresh Arts |  The Silos at Sawyer 1502 Sawyer St, Studio #103 Houston, TX 77007

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