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The Grant Proposal Writing Process

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Courtesy of the Writing Center at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill This article will help you write and revise grant proposals for research funding in all academic disciplines (sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the arts). It's targeted primarily to graduate students and faculty, although it will also be helpful to undergraduate students who are seeking funding for research (e.g. for a senior thesis).Grant writing varies widely across the disciplines, and research intended for epistemological purposes (philosophy or the arts) rests on very different assumptions than research intended for practical applications (medicine or social policy research). Nonetheless, this article attempts to provide a general introduction to grant writing across the disciplines.Although some scholars in the humanities and arts may not have thought about their projects in terms of research design, hypotheses, research questions, or results, reviewers and funding agencies expect you to frame your project in these terms. Learning the language of grant writing can be a lucrative endeavor, so give it a try. You may also find that thinking about your project in these terms reveals new aspects of it to you.Writing successful grant applications is a long process that begins with an idea. Although many people think of grant writing as a linear process (from idea to proposal to award), it is a circular process. Diagram 1 below provides an overview of the grant writing process and may help you plan your proposal development . . . read more at WritingCenter.unc.edu 
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Grant Proposal Tips for Individual Projects

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Q:  How do I write a grant proposal for my individual project? Where can I find samples?A:  Few proposal writing resources are geared specifically to individual grantseekers. Foundations that give to individuals have highly specific criteria, and this makes it hard to create a comprehensive "how-to" guide. Successful grant proposals:Deliver an important idea and address a significant issue.Show that the applicant has chosen an innovative approach to that issue.Describe reasonable objectives and a detailed plan to achieve them.Assure the funder that the applicant is capable of success.Explain how the project will advance the funder’s mission.In general, proposals from individuals do not exceed five single-spaced pages, in addition to the cover letter and the budget . . . read more a GrantSpace.org
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How to Write a Grant Proposal

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Persuasive, cohesive grant proposals are key to winning funding for visual artists from private foundations, the federal government and individuals. Writing grant proposals is generally thought to be something that is extremely difficult and time-consuming, It doesn’t have to be. What distinguishes one proposal from another is thoughtful, systematic and cohesive writing.There are three basic types of grant proposals:A letter of inquiry (LOI) is a one-to-two page summary that outlines the project. Funders request a brief description of the project before making a decision on whether to ask for a longer and more comprehensive proposal.A letter proposal is a three-five page description of the project plan, the purpose for which funds are being requested, and background information of the artist or group requesting funds.The long proposal is the most common document that funders seek. Three to forty pages or longer, it contains the cover letter and proposal summary. The usual format for a long proposal includes the need statement, goals and objectives, methods, budget, and evaluation.Here are some tips on how to craft winning grant proposals:Begin with the need statement, a description of the artistic need that your project is addressing. (Some funders refer to the need statement as the “problem” statement.)Support your need statement with persuasive evidence such as slides, photographs, news reports, etc.Use language and a format that are easy to read and understand, and be sure your need statement is consistent with your ability to respond to it responsibly . . . read more at ArtistsNetwork.com
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How to Apply for Art and Artist Grants, Residencies, Funding, Aid and Other Opportunities for Assistance

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Courtesy of Art Business.comGenerating income from art in the form of either cash or cash equivalents is always challenging, especially for artists with unconventional ideas or for those who create art that may not be commercially viable. The good news is that the art world is one place where anyone who shows talent and promise, marketable or otherwise, can get help in a variety of ways including cash grants, residencies, employment or internships, allowances, free or low-cost studio space, art supplies, exhibition space, and so on. Receiving these types of assistance is not easy; application processes can be rigorous and competition is often intense. So in the interest of giving you a bit of an edge in situations where you're contending for a bequest, here's a brief tutorial on procedural matters . . . read more at ArtBusiness.com  
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The Etiquette of Getting Grants

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Courtesy of NYFA c/o Chicago Artist Resource So you want a grant—that chunk of money that’s "out there" just waiting for your request? But you’re impatient, sometimes believing that the road to success must open before you faster than Moses parted the Red Sea. In your search for grants, you buy and read everything about this free cash, continually look for people to guide you to said loot, and still you haven’t gotten any closer to it. At some point, you’re probably going to run into me, hear about me, or be directed to seek me out. Be afraid. Be very afraid. I’m a whine-buster. I became a grant consultant in 1982 after applying for and receiving a grant from a writer’s organization. It was then that I discovered an over-abundance of often overlooked funding sources. As a result, I launched a monthly grants newsletter which preps subscribers to realistically assess if their funding needs can be sensibly obtained from immediate means—such as a local community service agency—or if their needs are best addressed through a grant. The following is a collection of familiar whines consistently thrown at me during my grant lectures, or via letters, email, or telephone. Each whine is followed by my usual response  . . . read more at Chicago Artist Resource  
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Guide to Funding Research

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Courtesy of Foundation Center.org If you are a first-time grant seeker, a new nonprofit staff or board member, or a volunteer for your favorite charity, this online guide was created with you in mind. It is intended both as a basic primer on the grant seeking process and as an introduction to some of the resources available with a special emphasis on those issued by the Foundation Center. If you prefer not to read the guide online, feel free to download sections for your own personal use. We cover foundations in detail, but we also talk about corporate and government funders as well as individual donors. Researching funders that will turn out to be good prospects takes time, but the results should be well worth this investment. Be realistic in your expectations. Foundations and other grant makers cannot meet all or even most of your financial needs. The vast majority of the money given to nonprofit organizations is actually donated by individuals. Foundations and corporations combined currently provide approximately 16.5 percent of all philanthropic gifts, but their grants can make up an important part of your support . . . view more 
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Follow The Money: Treasure Hunt For Grants

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Courtesy of ArtAdvice.com Artists are more susceptible than most to the economic downturn as fine art has long been considered a luxury, primarily for an audience with extra discretionary income. In times like these, even the very wealthy feel uncomfortable spending on what may be perceived by others as an extravagance. Smart collectors know this is the best time to buy and fine art is one of the safest places to “park” their money. But, they are looking primarily at very established artists with a verifiable sales and exhibition history. Values of these blue chip artists rarely go down significantly and smart buyers are on the lookout. But, for most emerging and mid career artists, the forecast is grim. Galleries are struggling to make ends meet and primarily exhibiting the works of artists they feel most confident they can sell. So, if you are thinking about approaching commercial galleries anytime in the near future, let me give you a reality check and some alternatives. Stay informed. Do your research and follow the news. Watch which galleries are advertising and who they are showing. This will be a strong indication of which galleries will survive and help you decide when you get ready to start approaching galleries again. Accept that the gallery world goes in ebbs and flows and you need to be able to recognize when it is your time to step in again . . . read more at ArtAdvice.com
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Study Fundraising: The Fundraising Audit

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Courtesy of StudyFundraising.info The fundraising audit is critical to an organization to achieve a good fit with its environment and to maximize its fundraising opportunities. This resource examines the key categories of information gathered in the audit and a number of the most commonly employed analytical tools.In this chapter we outlined the content of the first stage of a fundraising plan, namely; where are we now? The fundraising audit (the name we give to this section of the plan) is critical is an organization is to achieve a good fit with its environment and to maximize its fundraising opportunities as a consequence. We examined the key categories of information gathered in the audit and a number of the most commonly employed analytical tools. The supporting information for this chapter is grouped as follows: - Fundraising Planning - The Fundraising Audit - Macro Factors - Macro Factor Resources - Analysis of Competitors - Potential Collaborators - Market Factors - Internal Environment - SWOT Analysis . . . view more
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Tweet Freedom: How to Use Social Media and Still Have a Life

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Courtesy of the Abundant Artist We’ve all done it more than once when trying to be productive online: disappeared down the rabbit hole while our valuable time ticks by. Part of what makes social media and social networking such powerful tools is their capacity to suck us in with endless information and entertainment. But how do you harness that power, without it taking over your life? Short of hiring an intern, how do you add this to your already full plate?  Implementing an effective social media strategy takes focus, structure, discipline, and genuine enthusiasm, not unlike cultivating a rich and dynamic art practice. In fact, I urge you to see social media as an extension of your practice, where you have the control to shape the way your audience interacts with you and your output. In that spirit, here are some keywords to remember when crafting your strategy  . . . read more at the AbundantArtist.com
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Ten Tips for New Small Businesses

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Courtesy of Beth Laurence of NOLO.com-----Suggestions to help get your business off to a smooth start and keep it going for the long haul.1. Save up as much money as possible before starting.All too often, people go into business without any savings, exclusively using loan money from friends, banks, or the SBA. They except [sic] to be able to start paying the loans back right away with their profits. What these business owners don't realize is that it can take months or years to make a profit. And once a lender discovers a business isn't as profitable as expected, the lender is likely to call in the loan or refuse to renew it for another year. Often new business owners then have to take out home equity loans or use credit cards to pay off their loans (which puts their home and credit rating at risk) . . .. . . Continue reading at NOLO.com
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