Resume and Statements

How to Write an Artist Statement (Agora Gallery)

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Courtesy of the Agora Experts from agora-gallery.com-----As a professional artist, you need to have more than your work to get around in the art world. Along with your portfolio, you should have an artist statement available at a moment’s notice. An artist statement should be considered just as important as your works.WHY DO YOU NEED AN ARTIST STATEMENT?An artist statement is most often the front line of communication between an artist and the public. It will be used when you submit your portfolio to competitions, galleries, and museums. It may sometimes be displayed when people are viewing your works in person or on your website. If it’s online, your artist statement will be read by people from all over the world.There are many paths to becoming an artist, through school or an apprenticeship, or through inspiration and self-teaching but no matter how you got there, being a professional artist means that you have to have an artist statement. If you have never written a statement before, or aren’t sure that your current statement is up to art world standards, it can be a quite daunting task to compose one.Luckily, Agora Experts are here to help. Compiling years of experience in the art world, they are more than happy to share what they’ve learned.Here are some valuable tips for writing an artist’s statement: -----...Continue reading on agora-gallery.comImage Credit: Fred Tieken, Artist Statement, 2013 ; Acrylic on Cardboard ; 20" x 20"
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How to Write an Artist’s CV When You Don’t Have Much Professional Experience

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From the blog, The Practical Art World:The post How to Write an Artist CV in 10 Steps is the most popular in the history of The Practical Art World. Some of the most frequently asked questions people have after reading it are “What if I don’t have an exhibition history?” or “What if I didn’t go to school?”For new and emerging artists, creating an artist’s CV can be a bit of a Catch 22. You don’t have much or any experience to put on your CV, but to apply for “experience” in the form of exhibitions, grants, and schooling, you are asked to provide a CV.Fortunately, there are ways to tailor what relevant experience you have into an artist’s CV format. Just remember: don’t lie, and don’t make up anything that doesn’t exist. Just tell the truth, shaping it a little (creatively– it’s what you do best, right?) into the established CV format. If you haven’t already read How to Create an Artist’s CV in 10 Steps, start there. Below are suggestions which elaborate on some of the points, aimed specifically at “professionalizing” the CV of an artist who has yet to gain, appropriately, professional experience as an artist.To read more, click here. 
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How to Write an Artist’s CV in 10 Steps

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A great resource from the blog, "The Practical Art World." A CV or curriculum vitae is an overview of your artistic professional history and achievements. Although it looks similar to a resume, it contains different elements which are only related to your artistic professional practice.One mistake emerging artists often make in writing their CVs is trying to oversell their work. Less is more. Your CV should be neatly organized, and only include information pertinent to your artistic career.What should you include on a CV? Here is where how to compose one in 10 steps...Click this link to read more.
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Podcast: Shake Things Up With Another Artist Statement

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Find out why you might need more than one artist statement and when to use them.. . . listen at ArtBizBlog.com 
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Podcast: Straighten out your bio and statement

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Learn what the difference between a bio and a statement is and get yours straightened out. Original Podcast by Alyson Stanfield . . . listen art ArtBizBlog.com 
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Bios, Artist Statements and Pitches

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Courtesy of Columbia College of Chicago ARTIST STATEMENT: WHAT IT IS & WHY YOU’D WRITE ONE  Your artist statement differs from your bio statement and a mission statement because it isn’t about you, it is about your work. And, as much as we’d like for our art to speak for itself, it doesn’t.It can be about your body of work as a whole. However, more than likely it will be about a selection of your work when you're exhibiting work at a gallery, placing it on your website, or submitting a grant proposal to fund a potential project. To get started writing an artist statement, you must first understand what you’re writing about. Is it about a specific piece or your work as an artist? From here, ask yourself these questions: +  What do I want people to know about this body of work?+  What is my inspiration?+  What was my process and what did I use to create the work?+  What information do I absolutely need to provide my audience so they can understand my work? Use those questions and sketch out a draft. You can talk about yourself, but only as it relates to the outcome of your work (that inspiration part).  +  Revise that draft using the following pointers:+  Don’t be vague to sound intelligent. Drop the art speak.+  For example, don’t do this: “I see the world as a surreal collection of texture and movement. The perpetual shifts in culture change the human condition and predicament that can be seen here”.+  Instead, make sure to:+  Explain what you did and what you used.+  Explain the topic and what you’re trying communicate in the work.+  Explain what makes your work unique.+  Be specific and direct.+  Again, keep it short!   You’re the artist, write in 1st person. ARTIST BIO: WHAT IT IS & WHY YOU’D WRITE ONE A bio statement is your story. It is more than your resume in sentence form.  However, it is also not a chronological overview of your life. For example, “I was born in ____ and at a very young age I took an interest in _______ “.  Your bio, needs to be about who you are right now. Ever changing and evolving, your bio should talk about your immediate goals and projects and not about the long term. It is presumptuous and sounds arrogant to say:“I want to be a grammy award winning songwriter and producer” However, if your immediate goal was to write and produces songs in the hopes of one day reaching that level of success then a little humility goes a long way by telling us about what you’re doing and how you’re doing it (think about your mission): “I am currently working on numerous production projects and my work can be seen here _______ . I have ______ (background/history). It is with this experience that I approach songwriting and production as _______ (how you do it).” So, your bio is your story. It is about you. It is what you’re doing, what you’ve done, and how you do it. It doesn’t involve telling us about your cat or your favorite color. However, it can...if it works. Here are some things to consider when drafting your bio statement: +  Be concise and succinct (Keep it focused. Keep it short.)+  Be sincere+  Use your own words+  Write in 1st person or risk sounding like you still reside on Sesame Street+  Write well (watch that spelling and grammar)+  Be funny. If you’re not, don’t try to be.   WHERE TO USE IT Your bio statement is appropriate for your website, portfolio, Talent Pool profile, public facebook artist page, or any number of web “profile” platforms. One word of caution, think about saying the same thing differently in different places where you’re exhibiting your bio. For example, your website bio statement might be a slightly longer and more in-depth than the version that goes on the “About” section of your public Facebook page.  MISSION STATEMENT: WHAT IT IS AND WHY YOU'D WRITE ONE A mission statement isn’t usually the first statement that we’re telling you to write. We should be. You probably won’t use it publicly, but it is the one that will inform all the others. A mission statement provides the “why” and “how” of what you do. For example, take a stab at answering the following: +  Why do you make art?+  Why are you pursuing a career in the arts?+  What is your goal as an artist?+  Who are you creating are for? If you answered “because I have to” or “to make the world better” than you’re not quite there. It isn’t easy, but your mission statement should succinctly tell us why you’re doing what you do, how you’re doing it, and who you’re doing it for. It is ok to make art for yourself and your art doesn’t have to change the world, but you should be able to answer why you’re recording a record, exhibiting your art in a gallery, or performing on stage. Fill in the blanks of one of the following templates to draft your personal mission statement: Template Sample 1 : My mission is to use my [interest/abilities/positive personality traits] to achieve [your goals], based on my [principles/values/education]. Template Sample 2 : To be known and respected for my [expertise/abilities/qualities you wish to develop], which exhibits [principles/values/training/problem solving] and results in [your goal].  Template Sample 3 - To [what you want to be, or what you want to do] so I can [describe what achieving the aspiration you wrote in the first blank will let you experience, contribute or provide here]. To make this happen I will [list the most important actions you will take]. I believe my [list training, experience, values that set you apart and end with positivity and/or future aspirations]. Template 4 - As a [what you are], I [what you want to do, hope to do, what you are doing]. I [explain what makes you special about what you do]. I [say what you believe, include your values, training] and [end with how you will contribute positively to your artistic medium/industry/field/career/society].   WHERE TO USE IT Use it to guide and direct what you do. If you get to a point where your mission statement doesn’t reflect what you’re doing or what you want to do then it is time to draft a new one. With a clear and focused mission statement, you’ll have a much easier time dressing it up a little as an artist bio, artist statement, or pitch.ELEVATOR PITCHES: 

WHAT IT IS & WHY YOU’D WRITE ONE
It has long been described as the hypothetical situation where you’re in an elevator with only the time it takes to travel a few floors to introduce yourself, your value, and a proposition to someone that you want to work with.
 This doesn’t happen.
 However, what does happen is this...+ You’re at a party, concert, or exhibition and you’re asked the question, “What do you do?”+ You’re in an interview and you’re asked the question, “Tell me a little bit about yourself?”+ You’re at a family function and a relative asks, “So what you’re going to do when you graduate?”It is these circumstances that require the elevator pitch.
 At minimum it describes:+ Who you are+ What you do+ What makes you and what you do unique+ What you’re looking to do or asking forHere are some key things to keep in mind:+ Make it flexible, but know those key elements listed above intimately. + Use the pitch as a conversation starter, not a monologue.+ Use your pitch to ask a question to the person you’re pitching.+ Be yourself.  In all cases and context.+ Be concise. Again, make it short!+ Be interesting.Practice doing this. Parties, concerts, exhibitions, family functions, etc. All are great practice arenas of the “pitch”. read on the Portfolio Center Website. 
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Suggestions for Writing your Artist’s Statement (The Practical Art World)

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Courtesy of The Practical Art World.com-----I purposely did not call this post “how to write an artist’s statement.”  Because the answer is, there is no definitive right or wrong way to write an artist’s statement. The main purpose of an artist’s statement is to augment your artistic practice. This could be by offering background information, an explanation of your process, or any other information that will enhance the critical understanding of your work. Below are some suggestions to consider:Why are you writing an artist’s statement?... Does your work need to be fully explained?... Have you looked at examples of other artist’s statements?...  . . .  read more at ThePracticalArtWorld.com
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Standards and Guidelines for the Visual Artist Resume

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Courtesy of the College Art Association.  Adopted by the CAA Board of Directors in February 1999.----- General CommentsThe artist résumé conventions presented here are designed primarily for use with commercial galleries. While its length, one to four pages, is similar to the “short curriculum vitae,” or “short cv,” it is not intended for academic situations.Avoid making the artist résumé complicated. It is meant to be short and simple to review. Galleries may receive dozens of applications per week, so you will want to make it easy on the eye. Select fonts and font sizes that facilitate reading. Use the white spaces well. Do not submit your artist résumé on a computer disk or CD-ROM unless it is specified. Sample Artist Résumé (with Commentary)1. Name (in bold or larger font)Preferred mailing address: Phone Number(s): Work: Studio: Home: Fax: Email: Personal Website: (if appropriate)Comments: If a gallery gives you a show or takes you in as a stable artist, they may eliminate much of the information in this category. They will probably remove your address, phone numbers, etc., and provide your date or place of birth. This is a common practice because the gallery wants the potential buyer to contact them directly regarding any inquiries about your work.2. EducationMFA 1998 Sculpture University of KansasBFA 1995 Studio Art University of OklahomaBA 1992 French Southern Methodist University (cum laude)Comments: List all of the academic degrees you have earned (noting honors). It is not uncommon to have studied art at a university without completing the degree. You may want to list these periods of study after the list of degrees earned  . . .. . .  read more at CollegeArt.org
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The Musician's Resume Handbook

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Courtesy of the Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, New York.-----Dedication, years of practice, loads of talent, and a love of music are only a part of what it takes to launch a career as a successful professional musician. The manner in which musicians present themselves on paper and in person plays a significant role in getting the gig. The Musician’ s Résumé Handbook is designed to help you with one part of presenting yourself as a professional musician: the résumé. Whether you are a teacher, performer, school administrator, arts manager, or are still undecided, there will most likely be times in your professional career when you will need a résumé. Many musicians understand the important role a résumé can play in the job search process but don’t know where to start. From self-assessment to the finished product, this handbook will walk you through every step of preparing, planning, designing, and printing your résumé.  Table of Contents:What is a Résumé?Where to BeginBrainstormingFormat Types and Lengths of RésumésSelling YourselfActive VerbsReproduction of RésumeThe Finished ProductHow and When to Use your RésumeExample Résumés  View online or download below.
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The Musician Resume (MusicianWages.com)

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By David J. Hahn, Courtesy of Music Wages. (Thumbnail courtesy of Scott McFadden)-----Most musician jobs – club dates, songwriting – will never require a resume, and employers are increasingly turning to musicians personal websites for resume-like information.  Nevertheless, a musician’s resume is still a great marketing tool for getting gigs, and I still use mine frequently.Here are some basics that every musician should include when building their resume.1. Contact infoAt the top of the page you should include your name, cell phone number, email address and website URL.  You should also include at least the city you live in, if not your full address.  Where you live will be very important to contractors that might consider you for gigs near you.Duh, right?  But you should keep a few things in mind with your contact info.Make sure your email address isn’t something like “whips-and-chains@hotmail.com” or anything else like that.  If you were a contractor and you had to choose between “whips-and-chains@hotmail.com” and “steve@trombonesteve.com” – who would you pick?  Make sure the email address you use for professional correspondence is professional sounding.Give your cell phone number.  The people that hire for gigs are impatient.  If they call your phone and you don’t answer, or it’s a land line and you’re not home – they may very well just call the next musician on the list.  Give them a phone number that they can reach you at night or day.  And answer your phone!2. An Intuitive LayoutIt’s very likely that no one will ever read your resume in its entirety.  Most people scan through resumes for points of interest.  Where did this musician go to school? Who have they played with?  Where do they live?  You should use font techniques – like bold, italics, font-size, etc. – to make certain parts of your resume stick out from the rest.I have a friend who studied violin at Manhattan School of Music.  While she was there she took a class that included a section musician resumes.  As an exercise, her prof passed out a musician’s resume to the class.  They were to look at the resume for only 5 seconds, then turn it over and tell her if they could remember anything it said.This classroom exercise is similar to what’ll happen to your resume when you send it out.  It’ll likely get put in a stack of other resumes, and your potential employer will scan through all of them, looking for the right musician.Use large, bold fonts for those parts of your resume that you want people to notice.  For musicians that means where you were trained, the big gigs you’ve played, and anything else impressive.  All the other details of your resume should be in a regular-sized or small font.  It’s as if you were saying, “HEY LOOK AT THESE IMPRESSIVE THINGS I’VE DONE…and if you’d like, you can read the details as well.” . . . . . . read full article on musicianwages.com
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