PR and Marketing

Discover the best practices for marketing yourself as an artist

Are You In The Loop? How to Use Social Media as Your Next Level Marketing Tool

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Courtesy of ArtAdvice.com. I know what you are saying, “Ok, I give up, I’ve just mastered building a website and using my email, what the heck is social media?”In plain English, it means, the days of direct mailers and catalogs are over. The new generation of artists, gallery owners and consultants are programmed for faster, higher quality marketing techniques. Thanks to social media networking sites like Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter, we are able to connect 24/7 with our colleagues, fan base and peers. In short, social media leads to more exposure in less time. There are a few things you must know before you delve into the world of social media marketing. This is a platform to showcase your work and your art…not your personal life. If you already have a Facebook page, consider making a separate one used specifically for career purposes. No family photos, no vacation pictures, just work related news and images.This is a way to meet people, you wouldn’t normally meet and find people you have lost contact with. These sites are international. You might offer the best services in the world, or have some amazing work- but how will you ever get mass recognition? Social media is the missing puzzle piece. All it takes is a short e mail to let someone know you’d like them to view your work and become a part of your page or network. This is also a way to see who their contacts are and possibly connect with old friends. This eliminates what used to be years worth of networking and/or lost phone calls and e mails.Keep it up to date. Once you establish a profile on one or all of these sites, keep your pictures, blogs, and contact information up to date. You never know who will be curious about you. Stay current and accessible.It is FREE exposure. There is no cost to sign up to any of these sites. No domain name to buy, no price per picture uploaded. This is a necessity to keeping your business in the “now.”-with no cost to you. Still not 100% convinced? Here are some interesting facts about social media:346,000,000 people globally who ready blogs700,000,000 photos are uploaded to Facebook.com monthly55% of internet users upload and share pictures57% of internet users have joined a social network . . . read more
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How to use the “Art of Conversation” to Market Your Art

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Courtesy of Empty Easel. You may have the best art in the world, but if you’re talking to the wrong people, you won’t have a business. Conversations with the right people at the right time, in the right place, about the right things can lead to relationships. It’s those relationships, carefully nurtured, that lead to sales.One of my clients, Valerie Edwards, explains how having that art marketing “conversation” was even a source of fear:“Art galleries, publishers, clients, newspaper reporters. . . talking about my work with strangers, being the center of attention—it was overwhelming. Aletta helped me to face my social anxiety and understand that this is a common fear. She walked me through it, giving me sample social situations and verbal replies for guests at my first reception. When ’show time’ arrived, I talked non-stop for two hours and sold a painting for $1,000.00!”The thing that I tell all my clients is that you can learn to have those conversations and market your art successfully. There are just three parts to a successful conversation.The Beginning: Making contactThe best conversations happen when you and the other person share a common interest. That’s enough to get the conversation started. Then treat the other person with respect and be curious about them.What you say to get a conversation going is not as important as making it easy for the other person to respond. To do this, you can:• ask for information• offer information• give a compliment• ask for an opinion• use appropriate humorIt’s that simple. Once you’re in the conversation, you can move on to the second part:. . . read more
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NYFA Blog: Creative People Using Facebook Creatively

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“Friend me!” is a phrase no longer reserved for teens. Although Facebook was conceived as a social networking platform, many businesses use the site to brand and market their products (in fact, Facebook is so pervasive that Obama recently hosted a town hall meeting at Facebook’s headquarters in Silicon Valley, CA).  Along with services like Twitter, Myspace, WordPress, Flickr, and Youtube (just to name a few), Facebook has become a marketing tool and virtual public utility.What does this have to do with artists? The demand for professional development programs for artists indicates that a successful career in the arts requires not only talent, but also business sense. If businesses and entrepreneurs are benefitting from using social media, perhaps it is a strategy artists should also apply to their personal business models.Many artists have already taken the cue that social media can be professionally constructive. Zoe Keating, an avant-garde cellist, has so successfully cultivated her online presence that she can support herself and her family solely through her artwork.Ms. Keating helped conceive of CASH (Coalition for Artists and Stakeholders) Music’s web apps that allow users to get a free song if they tweet or Facebook about an artist. She also has 1.3 million twitter followers . . . read more
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NYFA: The Skinny on Slide Registries

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You want to sell your work online. Why not, a sale is a sale, right? But the world of online galleries can be complicated to steer. We talked with the owners of some of the web's most respected visual arts sites and asked them what they would tell artists to look for before signing up for online representation. What follows is their advice, which, despite the fabled diversity of views on the internet, was surprisingly uniform.Define Your Goals...Before you even approach a gallery you should decide what your goals are. Christine Bourron, president and founder of Paintings Direct, stressed that artists "need to be clear about their goals and why they want to go online." Noting that there can be "peer pressure" to have a website, she suggests several worthwhile reasons to go online. First, there is the opportunity to sell more art. Second, to have your work "out there" — to have your work seen and to receive feedback. Finally, there's a desire to be recognized, and sometimes a website can help do that. But, Christine warns, there is more than one way to go online, and you need to consider the options . . . read more at NYFA.org 
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8 Ways to Quickly Improve Your Website

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When was the last time that you thoroughly checked and edited your art blog or website to see that everything was in order? I mean going through your website page by page, post by post and image by image to see if everything was labeled, titled, tagged and in proper order?Like most of us, since we are all very busy, I am sure that the answer is “Geez, I don’t know”If you can take some time to look at your art blog and website with a critical eye, you might be surprised at what you find and what needs to be corrected, fixed or reworked. Once you take the time do this, your site should begin to perform much better in readability, effectiveness and in your search ranking. Take a look at some of the following areas of your art blog or website that probably will need some fixing or fine tuning . . . read more at FineArtTips.com 
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Press Release Marketing Tips for Artists

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Today, press release marketing presents the artist with another low cost opportunity to promote their artwork. If done properly, press release marketing will bring traffic to the artist’s website, help in building and maintaining an artist's brand and will eventually create incoming links to the artist’s website, thus, enhancing it’s SEO and gaining a higher page rank too.  There are myriad of free and paid press release and event news websites that an artist can use to market and promote their art. To locate these sites go to the Google and type in “Free Press Release” or “Free Event Listing” into their search feature. After obtaining this information research through Alexa.com to see what the traffic is of each website (type the URL into the Alexa Search to see what their traffic rank is). The lower the Alexa Rank number, the better this is, as this indicates that more readers will be exposed to your press release . . . read more
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13 Practical Marketing Lessons: National Arts Marketing Project

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Thirteen practical marketing lessons drawn from the book, “The Experts’ Guide to Marketing the Arts” © by the Arts & Business Council of Americans for the Arts.  All lessons are available for download via the web link. Practical Lesson 1: The Big Picture: The Marketing Challenge for the ArtsPractical Lesson 2: Taming the Dreaded Situation AnalysisPractical Lesson 3: Finding your Audience through Market SegmentationPractical Lesson 4: Who Are You, Anyway?Practical Lesson 5: Minding Your Marketing P’sPractical Lesson 6: Attracting Diverse AudiencesPractical Lesson 7: Attracting Families and Crossing GenerationsPractical Lesson 8: Crafting a Persuasive MessagePractical Lesson 9: Getting More from MediaPractical Lesson 10: Marketing the Arts on the InternetPractical Lesson 11: Coming to Terms with Database and Direct MarketingPractical Lesson 12: Box Office MagicPractical Lesson 13: Making it Real
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Social Media Sites – Setting Your Strategy

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By Ada Pia d'Errico: The Business of Art & InspirationBefore launching into your social media site search, and signing up for all the sites under the sun, the first thing to do is to set a strategy. The strategy has to be actionable, reasonable, and as far as possible – easy. If it isn’t easy to execute and becomes a burden you’ll give up. It’s what happens to everyone when they get overwhelmed, frustrated and bored. 1. Your first task is set a strategy and to make sure the strategy won't weigh you down. Your strategy could consist of signing up to 3 generic sites, 3 niche sites, and allocating a set amount of time per day to updating, checking, responding, to those sites. You may decide to work across only 1 social media hub, 2 sites where you sell your art/products, and set up a newsletter. You may decide to write your own blog, etc. The strategy has to fit YOU, and it will change, so don’t get stuck in it – the social media landscape changes so quickly, and your strategy will have to adapt to those changes . . . read more at adapia.tumblr.com
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Fractured Atlas Course: Marketing: Demystified

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As an artist or arts organization, you have to be able to market your creative offering. And, since you’ll be competing with other art professionals, as well as every other place that people spend their discretionary income; you need to make sure your efforts are targeted and compelling.  Marketing Demystified is an introductory course that will explain marketing basics like market research, segmentation, positioning, pricing, distribution, promotion, and designing your creative offering. . . read more at FracturedAtlas.org NOTE:  This course is only available to registered Fractured Atlas users.  Spacetaker membership includes a free Fractured Atlas access. 
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18 Tips To Bring Visitors To Your Artist Website

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Suffering from low-traffic blues on your artist website? Your number of visitors is only limited by you! If you have a big enough imagination, are willing to think outside the box, and don’t mind some serious old-fashioned elbow-grease you can bring in a nice consistent stream of art-hungry visitors.Lets look at some simple but effective techniques to attract those art hungry fish to your website!:1. Make a list of galleries that feature work of a similar style to yours. Send them a letter of introduction and invite them to visit and review your website. Include a postcard with an excellent piece of your work.2. Pay to use an email marketing list focused on decorators, interior designers, or galleries.3. Join your local chamber of commerce and get your website listed in the business listings on their website.4. Have a monthly open studio and promote it each time with adds in the free section (normally community events) of your local newspaper. Include your website’s URL5. Send out regular online and offline press releases every time you have a significant event or achievement.6. Contact your old school or college alumni and ask to be added to the alumni listings on their website.. . . read more at ArtMarketingSecrets.com  
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