PR and Marketing

Discover the best practices for marketing yourself as an artist

Quick Guide: Brand Identity

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Courtesy of Columbia College Chicago The idea of "branding" covers a lot of ground these days but for the moment think of branding as visually linking your professional materials together so that your name, title and contact info are presented the same way on all your materials. This visual identity can be created with "type treatments," logos, and perhaps, images. The trick to creating an effective visual identity that will brand your materials is: 1) finding a look and feel that's in synch with the work in your portfolio and2) using it consistently. That can be as simple or as complicated as you want to make it. TYPE TREATMENT: Create a type treatment for your name by finding several fonts that you like- nothing too off-the-wall. Try out each font with your name and title (P.A., Actor, Designer, Writer, etc) if you choose to use a title. Then try them out at different sizes and in different colors. Print them out so you can see what they look like on paper. LIVE WITH IT: Tape your type treatments to the wall or the fridge and keep an eye on them for a few weeks. Some designs will begin to look crappy after a while and can be eliminated. Eventually one will emerge as superior. Then find a second font that is perhaps a plainer version of your "brand" font to use for your contact information . . . read more 
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Quick Guide: Networking

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Courtesy of Columbia College Chicago We are living in a brave new world. Trends shift daily but there are a few things students can do to stay ahead of the curve.  Right here, right now.  Below are five tips to help you network with professionals that along with a good portfolio and a great education will go a long way. 1. Just Do It The term networking brings with it the image of the guys from the show Entrouage. Their chest hair fluffed out, pointing at their friends at the bar, high fiving and trying to meet with faux-celebrities.  Truth is that networking is not nearly that hard or involved, in fact if you are doing it right you won’t even know you are doing it at all.   Networking is about making connections, but those connections should be sincere otherwise they won’t do you much good.   2. Prepare YourselfIt won’t do you much good to meet with some mover and shaker if you don’t have your materials in order.  Wait, what materials?  Well good question.  That depends on what you are interested in doing, but at the very least you should have a business card, some professional web presence and your work – video, writing, photography, etc – organized to illuminate what makes you such a commodity . . . view more 
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Quick Guide: Photographing Prints and Paintings

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 Artists and designers need high quality documentation of their prints and paintings for print portfolios, websites, graduate school applications, and for museum and gallery record keeping. If you carefully follow this guide and take the necessary time, you’ll get great photographs of your work. tools:  digital camera (not a point and shoot), tripod, thumb tacks, tape, 2 lights, tape measure, small level, Photoshop or other image retouching software.   1. Secure your painting or print flat against a wall 3 or 4 feet up from the floor away from any windows or unwanted light. Use thumbtacks or tape for prints. A table pushed against the wall will
 provide a ledge to set a painting on. Straighten the print/painting on the wall. Use a level.  (see fig. a)     . . . view more at Columbia College Chicago
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Making the Most of Studio Visits and Gallery Interviews

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Courtesy of ArtAdvice.com. If you are lucky enough to have scheduled a gallery interview or studio visit, it’s a good idea to keep some key issues in mind. Your goal is to make sure this will be an enjoyable and profitable experience for all concerned. Showing your work and/or having people in your studio can be a major stressor for most artists. You need to prepare yourself emotionally, as well as prepare your studio visually, for a lay person to be able to absorb what your work is about. This doesn’t mean you need to clean up clutter, or change the way you work, but, it does mean you need to give some thought to how much work is laid out for people to see, and how it is laid out. Before you begin to prepare for a gallery interview or studio visit, take a moment to write down your goals. What do you want this person (or people) to go away feeling, thinking, about you and your work? Then, work backwards, and make sure you do everything that will help move you towards that goal. Here are a few ideas to get you started: Be prepared to talk about your work in an intelligent way. Be able to note your major influences, sources of your imagery, and discuss your particular medium. Be ready to answer questions about your technique. Have a clear understanding of where you fit into the current contemporary art market and the role of your work in an art historical context. Here is a quick and easy way to put together a professional artist’s statement (or at least to think about it.) Just fill in the blanks: (Artist’s Name) most often works in the medium of (painting/sculpture/photography/etc) The most current body of work is from his/her (name the series or body of work) which continues his/her basic investigation/exploration into (nature/psychology/the cosmos/animal behavior/abstraction/landscape/fantasy or whatever else you can think of). (Artist name) has been exhibiting publicly for over (#) years and is a graduate of (college or university) His/her work can also be seen (in the following public collections or commercial gallery)  . . view more
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So… What is Guerrilla Marketing? An 8-Part Guide to the History and Approaches to Guerrilla Marketing

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Courtesy of WebUrbanist.comOver the past month, WebUrbanist has explored the ins and outs of the weird world of guerrilla marketing. What was once a fringe movement in the world of advertising has become much more popular and mainstream since the 1980s, when marketing expert Jay Conrad Levinson introduced the concept to the world at large.  But what is guerrilla marketing, exactly? If you’re still scratching your head about what this guerrilla stuff is all about, step onto the tour bus as we take one more look around. Keep hands and feet inside the vehicle at all times, please. We’ll review the highlights at each of our stops. Feel free to hop off and visit any of the sections that interest you, then hop back on to navigate the rest. 1) The History of Guerrilla MarketingIn part one of our guerrilla marketing series, we took a look at how advertising went from boring, educational, and sometimes downright false ads to the entertaining spectacle we know and love today. Jay Conrad Levinson, author of many books on the subject, is credited as the father of Guerrilla Marketing. His ideas paved the way for small businesses to compete in the marketing arena with the big companies, ushering in an era of innovative and sometimes extreme marketing ideas. But Levinson’s ideas aren’t just about getting the customer’s attention: companies have to be ready and willing to back up their advertising with excellent products and services . . . read more at WebUrbanist.com
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Art Marketing- Start By Building Your Database

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The more simplified you make your art marketing strategies, the more success you will have as you will enjoy the process of Marketing and Selling your Art.  In any business venture, one of the most important elements that sometimes gets forgotten or is not done properly is Building Your Contacts Database. Every business has a database but it is not held or used in a formalized way.   Art Marketing- How To Build Your Customer Database by juzer52
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The Top 10 Art Marketing Strategies- Brand Recognition

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Courtesy of Ezine Branding Articles. Art marketing in today’s world is more a science than ever before. With so many different outlets, successful artists have learned to tap all of these outlets and create their brand. Once an artist has created brand they will be able to increase the value of their Art and volume of Sales. Art Marketing Strategy of creating your brand has been difficult in the past. However this is not the case in today’s world of Internet Marketing. Using some simple art marketing techniques you too can be successful. Let’s look at both some online and off-line art marketing strategies to employ. 1. Purchasing a domain name and creating a website is the primary way to start your Art Marketing Strategy. In this day and age, most people go to Google and other search engines to find things out and therefore your online presence is very important. An important point is that you may want to purchase your name as your domain name or the name you intend to use as your artist name. This goes back to the branding strategy is a must for today’s artists  . . . read more
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5 Art Marketing Ideas for Artists: How to Stand Out From the Crowd

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 Courtesy of Empty Easel. Marketing your art doesn’t have to be extremely difficult.For example, a few days ago I found an artist who was giving away some of his paintings at freedailyart.blogspot.com. His explanation for this odd behavior was simple: that he was a relatively new artist trying to build awareness of his paintings.Naturally he doesn’t give away all of his artwork. Interspersed among the free paintings are others (usually larger ones) which cost something. But that “marketing hook” of giving away a free painting to anyone willing to pay shipping and handling stuck out in my mind—and that’s what good marketing is all about.So today I thought I’d talk about some ways that you can stand out from the crowd. I’m not talking about changing your art or changing yourself, I’m just talking about thinking a bit more like a marketing agent or an advertiser so that YOUR art gets noticed and—more importantly—so that YOU get remembered.Here are some of the ideas...keep reading here.
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Write a Press Release in 16 Easy Steps

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Courtesy of ArtistsNetwork:You’ve just been invited to have a solo show in your top-selling gallery. Maybe you’ve won a prestigious award at a national show. Or perhaps you’ve agreed to lead a weeklong painting holiday to a spectacular destination. Whatever the situation, it’s news, and you’ll want to get the word out.You don’t necessarily have to pay for an expensive ad. Why not get exposure for free? Newspapers, magazines and other publications often print newsworthy items they believe will interest their readers. To get this exposure, you’ll need to write a press release.Your press release must be concise and to the point. Before you set pen to paper, think back to your high school English class. A good story includes the who, what, when, where, why and how—and you must answer these questions in your release... READ MORE HERE. 
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NYFA: Marketing the Arts in Nonprofit Organizations

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Courtesy of New York Foundation for the ArtsMarketing is a fun and creative way to get your organization’s name out and increase your audience in both number and diversity. And it does not have to be expensive. It can range from putting up a flyer at the local grocery store to a series of newspaper ads, with a lot of room for creativity in between.In this guide, we give you proven techniques and tips to make your organization more marketing-savvy, increase your audience, and create a greater understanding about your organization in the community . . . read more
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