Portfolio Development

Web Portfolio 101 - The Basics (Columba College)

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Courtesy of Columbia College from Portfolio Center-----Of all the things a web site may be, a web portfolio is a curated selection of work that provides an overview of your creative experience. It basically tells someone how you want to be understood. A web portfolio can also serve as your main communication hub where the rest of your online presence branches out from.We encourage every student at Columbia to have a web portfolio (yes, that means you, too, ASL and education students!). You don’t have to know how to code, or know what a content management system (CMS) is to make a web portfolio.To get started, you’ll want to get:1. a website hosting system.2. a custom domain name....View complete resource (along with tutorial VIDEO) at Columbia College Portfolio Center website
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Text Based Portfolios (Columbia College)

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Courtesy of Colombia College Chicago-----Journalists, arts/entertainment/media managers and marketing/PR reps should not represent themselves with papers and press releases stuffed into a manila folder.  Potential clients and employers expect a professional, organized, and visually appealing representation of your best work.  The following guide will sketch out the elements and organization for a text-based print book.  Samples are provided to demonstrate that text heavy content can be displayed in a visually appealing and accessible way A text based print book should be:ProfessionalOrganizedEasy to navigateEasy to reproduce . . . View entire article with diagrams on Columbia College Portfolio Center website
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Image Based Portfolios (Columbia College)

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Courtesy of Columbia College Chicago ----- To build an effective, professional portfolio, consider the following:Selection: Your portfolio should reflect your very best projects and the needs and interests of the people you plan to approach for work. Find out what they need to see from you and select work samples that are as close a match as possible. Create new work for your book if you need to. Make it easy for clients to imagine working with you.  Sequence:The common wisdom “start strong- finish strong” plays to the idea that people best remember the first and last images in any given series. You would be wise to be attentive to that strategy but you should also work carefully to create a flow from picture to picture and project to project, beginning to end. The “flow” should take into account the subject matter of an image but also its visual form (line, shape, color). The sequence may seek to weave the images together in a seamless way or might, if appropriate, emphasize differences for a more active and assertive feel . . . view full list with images on the Columbia College Portfolio Center website
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VIDEO: How to Create an Artist Portfolio

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An art portfolio is important for an artist to display work to clients and galleries, and it should include a variety of work in the form of slides, transparencies or prints. Create an art portfolio with tips in this free video on art.    
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A Step-by-Step Guide to Portfolio Layout and follow-up

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by Becky Hubble, courtesy of Emerging Artist Guide. General Aspects of Good Portfolios 1. Your portfolio should be comprised of both textual and visual documentation of your career as an artist. This includes a CV, artist’s statement, and biography, as well as prints and digital images of your work. If possible, you should also include a “supporting documents” section that is comprised of third-party reviews or articles published about you as an artist. 2. Although you may wish to convey your creativity through the design of your portfolio, it is important to strike a balance between eye-catching design, and design that takes attention away from the work itself. It is extremely important that your portfolio should never be designed at the expense of complying with the requirements outlined by the recipient. 3. Your portfolio should be free of spelling and grammatical errors, be easy to navigate, and well-written. It should be professional. This includes being free of damage, looking neat and well-organized, and fulfilling all the requirements the recipient has asked for. 4. Your portfolio should include your best work. It is better to include fewer stronger pieces, than a plethora of weaker pieces. 5. Even a good portfolio can benefit from the critique of a knowledgeable person. Regardless of your level of experience, a second (or even third) opinion is an invaluable portfolio-proofing tool.  Choosing and Organizing Visuals and Text Displaying an understanding of who you are submitting your portfolio to, and for what purpose, is one of the most important things you can do to make your portfolio stand out. Your portfolio should reflect you as an artist, but it is equally important that it reflect the recipient through content and organization. It is important to understand the business perspective of the portfolio recipient. This knowledge will provide some much needed guidance when choosing the visual and textual components of your portfolio. For example, if you are hoping to establish a long term relationship with a gallery, a portfolio conveying a sense of consistency and gradual thematic progression would enable a gallery to more confidently take a chance on you, knowing the kind of work they will be investing in over the long-term, than a portfolio comprised of radically disjointed work . . . view online or download full pdf below.
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Artist portfolio development advice from 'Dr. Art'

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Courtesy of IndEFocus.comDeveloping an artist portfolio that properly displays your skills, talents and unique artistic viewpoint is key to staying afloat in the art world. ‘Dr. Art’ of mnartists.orggives the following tips to help you make the most of your artist portfolio; Everything in the art world slows down during the summer months. The number of exhibitions and openings dwindle as many galleries close for vacation. The summer is therefore the perfect time for artists to rethink their presentation materials. With that in mind, the Hotline’s first column is a refresher course on one of the basics: the artist’s portfolio. Here are some answers to questions concerning your portfolio. What role does my portfolio play in applying to a gallery? When first applying to a gallery, your purpose is not to immediately get an exhibition, but to introduce them to your work. Hopefully your work will incite them to schedule a studio visit. Following your studio visit, you may then be included in a group show or two at the gallery. Group shows are good testing grounds for galleries to see how critics and collectors respond to your work. Only after first developing a solid relationship, will you later be considered for a solo exhibition at the gallery. Make sure that the gallery you are applying to exhibits artwork in your style and/or medium. If you are an abstract painter, for example, you should never submit your portfolio to a gallery that shows only representational photography. Artists should also keep in mind the real purpose of your portfolio.  What should my portfolio contain? Once you locate a potential gallery, your artist’s portfolio should always contain the following itemsA cover letterAn artist resume (also known as a Curriculum Vitae)An artist statementVisual materials (such as slides, photographs, videotapes, etc.)A press packet (your reviews, catalogue excerpts, etc.)A self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) with enough return postage . . .  read more at indefocus.com
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NYFA: Portfolio Development

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By Susan Myers, Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts. Your portfolio is a valuable tool in your arsenal as an artist, and it is often the first opportunity you have to impress and influence those in charge of making the decisions and choices that affect you and your work. By developing and preparing a professional portfolio, every artist is taking a step towards ensuring her or his own success. In general, a portfolio consists of various presentation materials representing both the artist and her or his work. Some artists will have a very detailed and complex portfolio, but the basics almost always include: an artist résumé and bio, an artist statement, work samples, press clippings or reviews of artwork, and, if appropriate, a query or cover letter. I see the artist's portfolio as an evolving assortment of credentials that can be modified and tailored for any particular audience. While each artistic discipline has its own conventions and standards in preparing a professional portfolio, all artists can benefit from the information and suggestions included below. Artist Résumés and BiosJust as an employment résumé outlines employment history, experience, and skills, an artist résumé details the accomplishments, endeavors, knowledge, and abilities of an artist. There are many common conventions that all professional résumés should follow. Remember, an artist résumé is not an “artistic” résumé. You want to present yourself and your accomplishments in a professional manner. Artist résumés are organized by headings or categories that outline your particular artistic activity. Under each heading—listed by date with the most recent event first—list and then summarize the necessary information. Headings should stand out and can be bulleted, bold, underlined, or italicized. The specific categories you include depend upon the artistic discipline with which you are involved. Typically, an artist résumé is one to four pages in length. Most artists have two versions of their résumé prepared: a long version and a one- or two-page version. Your résumé should be easy to read, typed, and printed on quality paper. Résumé paper should be muted in color. I prefer to see résumés printed on white, off-white, or ivory. Font size should be no smaller than 10 pt., and should be a font type that is easy to read. I find it helpful to include a date in the upper right-hand corner of my résumé. The date helps remind me when I last updated my résumé, and it also lets others know if my résumé is current . . . read more.
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Artist Portfolio Guidelines

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Courtesy of art-support.com. This article feature ideas on how to create a successful artist portfolio and how to present your portfolio to galleries or to anyone. The information is useful to anyone in working in fine art or commercial art. It will help all photographers, painters and other artists that might one day have to create artist portfolio or present their artworks to a gallery. To become successful in today's art market, an artist must have a vision, they must master the technical skills required in your art medium, and the artist needs to understand of the business of art. When presenting a portfolio, not only the artists work is being judged, the artist is also being judged. Is this artist or photographer serious? Will he or she succeed in the art world? Are they worthy of being represented? Your artist portfolio should impress viewers with your vision and with how well you have mastered the technical aspects of photography. To go along with your portfolio, you should provide good artist support materials. This site was designed to help you to understand the importance of good artist support materials and help you to understand the business side of art.PERSPECTIVERemember, no matter what you've heard or read, your work doesn't stand alone. Whenever a gallery owner, museum curator, or art consultant reviews your portfolio, the memory of your photographs will be only part of what you leave behind. Just as packaging plays an increasingly important role in product marketing, you are as integral to your presentation as your images. A successful portfolio presentation is absolutely necessary if you expect to become represented gallery or make a lot of sales PORTFOLIO DESIGNYour photographs must be presented in a professional manner. Choose only finished prints for your portfolio. Never show work prints or unspotted prints. Always show your best work. Plan your portfolio carefully. A good portfolio should have continuity and provide viewers with a clear idea as to what your vision is. It should be organized by subjects or different photographic styles. Horizontal and vertical images, as well as different size prints should be organized and grouped separately. Black and white images and color images should also be grouped separately for easier viewing . . . read more at Art-Support.com
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The Art of WordPress: Portfolio Solutions for Artists

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Courtesy of Monica Danna @ COLAB Click on the link to download the presentation.
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Preparing for an Artist Portfolio Review or Presentation

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Adapted by Marta Sanchez Philippe, FotoFest, for a workshop presented at Spacetaker ARC, June 2011Preparing for an Artist Portfolio Review or Presentation Preparing for an Artist Portfolio Review or Presentation from Fresh Arts
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