Personal Networking

How to Become Almost Famous in Your Town

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 By D.L. Hawley, courtesy of Artists Register.com The better known you are in your own community, the more people will recognize your name and your art and become customers. Here are eight ways to become a well-known artist in your community. 1. Network through organizations.Join organizations such as the chamber of commerce, business networking groups, church groups, hobby clubs and others. Tell everyone you meet you’re an artist. Liberally pass out your business cards. Volunteer to speak at meetings. Keep a mailing list from the business cards you receive to send show invitations or notices about your new work. This will keep reminding everyone you’re a local artist. 2. Volunteer at school art programs.Become a volunteer at schools by offering to help teach art classes, act as a supervisor for an art club or an adviser on school art projects. Send a letter home with each student introducing yourself to the parents, complimenting their child’s artistic talent and inviting them to your next scheduled show. 3. Donate art to nonprofit auctions.Find nonprofit associations that raise funds by having art auctions. Donate a piece of art and include a small, professional-looking card with your name, phone number and your artist’s statement to be placed near your work. Attend the auction, talk to people and pass out your business cards or an invitation to your next show. 4. Volunteer at your community theater.Volunteer at a community theater and help create the sets or design artwork for the program cover. Ask for a mention in the program or free ad space in the program. Or volunteer to write a brief article on how the sets were created and include your byline as "Mary Smith, artist." Help promote the theater when you talk to people at other organization events you attend. 5. Have shows at your studio.Hold an art show at your studio to tie in with other community eventsfrom "art walks" to homecoming or the local fair. If you work in your home, clear the furniture from your living room and create a gallery for a day. Promote the show with the tie-in event. 6. Show your work everywhere.Enter local shows. Find restaurants and other businesses that hang local artists’work and participate in their programs, or help these businesses start one. Join with other artists and hold joint shows. Place a small, professional-looking card with your name, phone number and your artist’s statement near each piece of your work 7. Teach a community education art class.Examine the community education art classes that are offered and create one that offers something different and matches your talents. The school will promote your class, but you also need to promote it at all the organizations you belong to. Keep a mailing list of students and invite them to all your shows. 8. Develop a public relations program.Send a media release to your local newspaper, radio stations and television stations every time you do something newsworthy. If a reporter covers a play at the community theater and you designed the sets, ask to be interviewed. Create a media kit containing your photo, your art resume, photos of your art, and a letter stating your availability to be interviewedon short noticefor any news stories or features involving art. Enjoy meeting people and talking about your art. Keep at it. Sooner than you think, people will start remembering your name and seek you out. D.L. Hawley is a freelance writer and oil painter.Reprinted with permission from www.artistsmagazine.com
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How to Generate Great Word of Mouth

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By Daniel Kehrer, Founder of BizBest.  Courtesy of Score.org Word of mouth is vital to any small local business that hopes to grow. For a fortunate few, it just happens naturally. But word of mouth can also be planned, executed and nurtured as a specific marketing method. Attending to the basics is important. Word of mouth comes from having happy customers, so that’s still Job #1.Here are seven steps to getting your word of mouth (WOM) effort underway:1. Target the talkers. Makes sense, right? It is word of mouth, after all, so you need to aim your efforts at the people who like to talk about the great products, services and businesses they use. They are your customers, of course.  Remember, these might  include people who have a recommendation when somebody asks them for one – even if they aren’t naturally talkative or write reviews.2. Develop a pitch line that’s interesting and easy for people to share. The “interesting” part is vital. Avoid being boring at all costs. Who wants to share something boring? Ask yourself, honestly, why a customer would want to talk about you? Forget your brand statement or product brochure. Try not to think like a marketing person. This is consumer-to-consumer, so your story line should sound like one person telling another about something great they’ve discovered. Boil it down to one sentence. Maybe two.3. Be amazing. There’s no way around this. If you want people to spread the word about you, you have to deliver something exceptional. So in addition to being interesting, you’ll need to deliver customer service that’s above-and-beyond – and make sure everyone who works for you does the same. Your products and packaging — including your store, office and website  — should look great. If you and your employees are excited and energized about what you do, it will spread to your customers.4. Put it in motion. You already have lots of ways to do this. For example, your business profile, website, newsletter, brochure, emails and social media pages should include “tell-a-friend” forms or functions. Consider using postcard mailings, coupons, stickers, buttons and QR codes. When you make it easy for people to share, they are much more likely to do so.5. Create continuous reasons to talk. You can create word of mouth opportunities with special sales, great new features or something fun, such as a contest or event. Think distinctive: Do something others aren’t. Establish a unique personality for your business that includes certain colors, shapes, a stand-out design or maybe even a mascot. These things make it easier for people to remember you.6. Connect to the conversation. Having a presence online – specifically in social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+ — is a great way to join and facilitate conversations about your business. The best and most simple thing you can do is simply ask questions. You’ll be surprised at how willing consumers are to provide feedback when they’re asked what they think. Ask some questions about your business and its products and services. But you can also ask broader questions to get more acquainted with your customers’ goals, needs and tastes. Posting comments on blogs or having your own blog can also help.7. Show appreciation. This step too often gets overlooked. When you hear about someone who has recommended your business, say thanks. Send lots of thank you notes. Keep in mind that people like feeling like they are part of an “insider” group, so share information about things you may be planning or thinking about, and ask for feedback.  When you gain new clients, customers or prospects, ask them how they heard about you so you know whom to thank. Reply to emails, Facebook messages and blog comments as quickly as possible.  This will in turn generate even more WOM.Daniel Kehrer is Founder of BizBest (www.bizbest.com), a free and independent information service for small business, and editor of ShopTalk: Social Media for local business (www.dexsocial.com). Twitter: @BizBest  © 2011 BizBest Media®
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Funding Strategies for Artists and Arts Groups

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Grants, Contributions, Fiscal Sponsorship, Thinking outside the box.  By Jenni Rebecca Stephenson. (Originally presented August 31, 2011. Some information may be outdated. Stay tuned for an updated version.)Identifying Resources & Funding Strategies for Artists and Arts Groups 2.0View more PowerPoint from Spacetaker
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Tips for Art Events

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Prepared by Lindsay Peyton, Cadence Enterprise  1. Be a great host a. Circulateb. engage conversations c. introduce guests to each other 2. Make: a. title of eventb. theme c. interesting space d. good lighting e. music or performance 3. If your budget is low, still think big a. seek sponsorsb. try food and beverage distributors c. be creative 4. Collaborate a. work with other artists, if they are dedicated b. collaborate with a nonprofit group c. tie in with a charity 5. Plan ahead!!! a. events take time to organize or they can be disasters – give yourself moretime than you need b. check social events calendars in area to make sure you don’t have aconflicting date c. create a timeline with deadlines for yourself d. recruit volunteers, including friends and relatives to help promote and staffevents e. make a promotions timeline too – so you can send out evites, pressreleases, etc. Tips for not being too shy at shows:1. Create objectives - do you want to meet people, sell work, add to your guest list, etc...2. Get in a good mood before the show -- be positive, set aside time to relax, don't drink away your nerves :)3. Be a host -- get other volunteers to help with sales, serving, etc. so you can talk to people without stressing the little details4. Talk to people besides just your immediate friends and family -- talk to new people, even if you have to practice what you would say before the show. Some easy conversation starters -- How did you hear about the show? What type of artwork do you enjoy?5. Think about what you want to communicate in advance -- consider your artist statement

Presenting Yourself: Interviews & Public Speaking

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Courtesy of ArtJob.com Blogger Karen Atkinson on how to present yourself during a job interview or when speaking in public. You will come across many situations where you have to present yourself and your work: job interviews, studio visits, curator visits, public art presentations, lectures, workshops, grant interviews, symposiums, teaching demonstrations for interviews, collectors, gallery talks, museum walkthroughs, reviewers/writers, presentations to funders, producers and more. The following are considerations you should address before you present yourself. Preparing ahead of time can make a significant difference in how other people perceive you and your work. Consider:Who are you meeting with and what is the context? Are you meeting at a gallery or organization, at a coffee house or at your studio? Do you have to drag your materials with you, and how will you present them?What are you seeking and why are you seeking it from them? Be clear about your intentions. Are you asking for general support or something very specific? Has the purpose of the meeting been established, or will you have to articulate it? . . .  view more 
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Quick Guide: Networking

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Courtesy of Columbia College Chicago We are living in a brave new world. Trends shift daily but there are a few things students can do to stay ahead of the curve.  Right here, right now.  Below are five tips to help you network with professionals that along with a good portfolio and a great education will go a long way. 1. Just Do It The term networking brings with it the image of the guys from the show Entrouage. Their chest hair fluffed out, pointing at their friends at the bar, high fiving and trying to meet with faux-celebrities.  Truth is that networking is not nearly that hard or involved, in fact if you are doing it right you won’t even know you are doing it at all.   Networking is about making connections, but those connections should be sincere otherwise they won’t do you much good.   2. Prepare YourselfIt won’t do you much good to meet with some mover and shaker if you don’t have your materials in order.  Wait, what materials?  Well good question.  That depends on what you are interested in doing, but at the very least you should have a business card, some professional web presence and your work – video, writing, photography, etc – organized to illuminate what makes you such a commodity . . . view more 
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Making the Most of Studio Visits and Gallery Interviews

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Courtesy of ArtAdvice.com. If you are lucky enough to have scheduled a gallery interview or studio visit, it’s a good idea to keep some key issues in mind. Your goal is to make sure this will be an enjoyable and profitable experience for all concerned. Showing your work and/or having people in your studio can be a major stressor for most artists. You need to prepare yourself emotionally, as well as prepare your studio visually, for a lay person to be able to absorb what your work is about. This doesn’t mean you need to clean up clutter, or change the way you work, but, it does mean you need to give some thought to how much work is laid out for people to see, and how it is laid out. Before you begin to prepare for a gallery interview or studio visit, take a moment to write down your goals. What do you want this person (or people) to go away feeling, thinking, about you and your work? Then, work backwards, and make sure you do everything that will help move you towards that goal. Here are a few ideas to get you started: Be prepared to talk about your work in an intelligent way. Be able to note your major influences, sources of your imagery, and discuss your particular medium. Be ready to answer questions about your technique. Have a clear understanding of where you fit into the current contemporary art market and the role of your work in an art historical context. Here is a quick and easy way to put together a professional artist’s statement (or at least to think about it.) Just fill in the blanks: (Artist’s Name) most often works in the medium of (painting/sculpture/photography/etc) The most current body of work is from his/her (name the series or body of work) which continues his/her basic investigation/exploration into (nature/psychology/the cosmos/animal behavior/abstraction/landscape/fantasy or whatever else you can think of). (Artist name) has been exhibiting publicly for over (#) years and is a graduate of (college or university) His/her work can also be seen (in the following public collections or commercial gallery)  . . view more
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So… What is Guerrilla Marketing? An 8-Part Guide to the History and Approaches to Guerrilla Marketing

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Courtesy of WebUrbanist.comOver the past month, WebUrbanist has explored the ins and outs of the weird world of guerrilla marketing. What was once a fringe movement in the world of advertising has become much more popular and mainstream since the 1980s, when marketing expert Jay Conrad Levinson introduced the concept to the world at large.  But what is guerrilla marketing, exactly? If you’re still scratching your head about what this guerrilla stuff is all about, step onto the tour bus as we take one more look around. Keep hands and feet inside the vehicle at all times, please. We’ll review the highlights at each of our stops. Feel free to hop off and visit any of the sections that interest you, then hop back on to navigate the rest. 1) The History of Guerrilla MarketingIn part one of our guerrilla marketing series, we took a look at how advertising went from boring, educational, and sometimes downright false ads to the entertaining spectacle we know and love today. Jay Conrad Levinson, author of many books on the subject, is credited as the father of Guerrilla Marketing. His ideas paved the way for small businesses to compete in the marketing arena with the big companies, ushering in an era of innovative and sometimes extreme marketing ideas. But Levinson’s ideas aren’t just about getting the customer’s attention: companies have to be ready and willing to back up their advertising with excellent products and services . . . read more at WebUrbanist.com
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Art Marketing- Start By Building Your Database

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The more simplified you make your art marketing strategies, the more success you will have as you will enjoy the process of Marketing and Selling your Art.  In any business venture, one of the most important elements that sometimes gets forgotten or is not done properly is Building Your Contacts Database. Every business has a database but it is not held or used in a formalized way.   Art Marketing- How To Build Your Customer Database by juzer52
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The Top 10 Art Marketing Strategies- Brand Recognition

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Courtesy of Ezine Branding Articles. Art marketing in today’s world is more a science than ever before. With so many different outlets, successful artists have learned to tap all of these outlets and create their brand. Once an artist has created brand they will be able to increase the value of their Art and volume of Sales. Art Marketing Strategy of creating your brand has been difficult in the past. However this is not the case in today’s world of Internet Marketing. Using some simple art marketing techniques you too can be successful. Let’s look at both some online and off-line art marketing strategies to employ. 1. Purchasing a domain name and creating a website is the primary way to start your Art Marketing Strategy. In this day and age, most people go to Google and other search engines to find things out and therefore your online presence is very important. An important point is that you may want to purchase your name as your domain name or the name you intend to use as your artist name. This goes back to the branding strategy is a must for today’s artists  . . . read more
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