Funding Options

The ultimate guide to protecting credit in a freelance and gig economy

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The ultimate guide to protecting credit in a freelance and gig economyA nontraditional career path requires a financial planBy Tamara E. Holmes  |  Updated: April 20, 2018Being a freelancer or your own boss in the gig economy may sound like a great deal, but without proper planning, a freelancing lifestyle can turn into a credit disaster. Approximately 57.3 Americans – 36 percent of the U.S. workforce – do some type of freelancing, according to a 2017 study by Upwork and Freelancer’s Union. A whopping 47 percent of working millennials freelance, and by 2027, the majority of the U.S. workforce will consist of freelancers, the study found.  When you make a living doing freelance assignments, temporary jobs or consulting work, you get flexible hours, and may even be able to work from anywhere. The appeal is far-reaching. Nearly 40 percent of Americans said they would prefer being a gig worker to holding a full-time job, according to a 2016 survey by global workforce solutions adviser Staffing Industry Analysts.But the freedom and flexibility can come at a cost. Maintaining a good credit score and having credit readily available can become more difficult, and a nonsteady paycheck can leave you teetering on the edge of financial ruin. If you’re thinking about joining the gig economy, be proactive to protect your finances and maintain a good credit score while pursuing a nontraditional career.Read more
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Funding Strategies for Independent Artists 2014

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THE PRESENTATION FROM THE WORKSHOP DESCRIBED IS EMBEDDED BELOW. Funding Strategies for Independent ArtistsMonday, April 21, 2014Art League Houston, Main Gallery1953 Montrose Blvd.Houston, TX 77006Fresh Arts’ Executive Director Jenni Rebecca Stephenson and professional composer and musician, Jerry Ochoa of Two Star Symphony, provide an overview of strategies and resources for individual artists seeking funds to support their professional art career.This workshop covered: identifying grant opportunities (including several key local opportunities), increasing accessibility to additional funding through fiscal sponsorship, and securing individual contributions and institutional support. The workshop will also provide tips for creating and managing successful crowd-funding campaigns and offer examples of how local artists have successfully raised money for their projects. (Specifics on grant-writing and crafting proposals are NOT covered in this workshop, but will be covered later in Fresh Arts’ workshop series.)This workshop applies to all types of individual artists including those in the visual, performing, filmmaking, literary, and multi-disciplinary fields. Funding strategies for individual artists 3.0 from Spacetaker
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Fractured Atlas & Indie GoGo: Fiscal Sponsorship and Crowd Funding

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On March 10, 2011, Dianne Debicella of Fractured Atlas and Danae Ringelmann from IndieGoGo shared this insightful presentation on fiscal sponsorship and crowd funding opportunities for artists. Hosted by Spacetaker.IndieGogo & Fractured Atlas Info Session at SpacetakerView more presentations from Spacetaker
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GrantSpace.org Skills Resources

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GrantSpace provides easy-to-use, self-service tools and resources to help nonprofits worldwide become more viable grant applicants and build strong, sustainable organizations.  GrantSpace is a service of the Foundation Center.Resource Skills Topics include:AccountabilityBoard DevelopmentCareer DevelopmentCollaborationCorporate FundingProposal WritingFinancial ManagementFind Foundation/Corporate DonorsFiscal SponsorshipFundraisingImpact, Outcomes & EvaluationIndividual GivingLeadership & ManagementOrganizational SustainabilityMarketing & CommunicationsSocial EnterpriseStartup & DissolutionVoluntarism  
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Fiscal Sponsorship + Crowdfunding= $$ for Creative Projects

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 Presented by Dianne Debicella - Program Director, Fiscal Sponsorship. Presentation covers:Definition of fiscal sponsorship and crowdfunding,Taking advantage of the fiscal sponsorship program, Review of the leading crowdfunding platform,Keys to crowdfunding success,Benefits of crowdfunding,and Crowdfunding myths. Fiscal Sponsorship + Crowdfunding = $$ for Creative ProjectsView more PowerPoint from Spacetaker
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Future of Music Coalition: Artist Revenue Streams

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 How are today's Musician's earning money? Artist Revenue Streams is a multi-method, cross-genre examination of how US-based musicians’ revenue streams are changing, and why. This mini-site is the home of our project’s releases and findings. We will issue multiple reports and presentations here from January-June 2012. Learn About Revenue StreamsThrough this work, FMC has organized a consolidated list of 42 revenue streams available to US-based composers and musicians related to their compositions, recordings, performance, brand, or knowledge of craft. Learn more about how we asked questions and grouped revenue types in the survey.  Learn how orchestral players are compensated when sound recordings are sold. 
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How to Get an Artist Grant

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Courtesy of Valerie Atkisson of ArtBistro Do you have a great idea, but can’t afford to make your dreams into a reality? You need an artist grant. Grants are a great benefit to artists. They help beginning creative professionals reach career goals; provide support while working on a specific project and can even enable artists to research for a piece or collection.Sounds great, right? Not so fast — grants are very competitive and the amount awarded, stipulations, and application procedures for each grant vary widely. Some grants are privately funded, while some are publicly funded. And, many are given for a specifically proposed project while some are awarded outright for the work done. But, as one artist/mentor advised me, “Don’t give up until you have applied at least ten times.”How to Apply...Jackie Battenfield, artist and business practices specialist has the following advice about artist grants:“If you aren’t in it you won’t win it. How many times have you rejected yourself by not following through with an application? If you are eligible for an artistic grant, then it is your responsibility to your work to apply for it. Don’t let this year’s rejection keep you from reapplying next year. Panel’s change, your work develops and you may become the perfect match for the grant.Guidelines Many grants are rejected because the applicant has not followed the guidelines. Read the guidelines carefully. If they are online, print them out and use a marker to highlight the most important information. Confirm that your application includes exactly what is requested . . . read more at ArtBistro.com
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Commissions and Grant Writing - Workshop Powerpoint

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By Dr. Michael Remson, American Festival for the Arts.A career seminar presented by Impulse Artist Series and Spacetaker. (Transcript of presentation is available on Slideshare website by clicking the "Commissions & Grant Writing" link belowCommissions & Grant Writing Commissions & Grant Writing from Fresh Arts
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Funding Strategies for Artists and Arts Groups

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Grants, Contributions, Fiscal Sponsorship, Thinking outside the box.  By Jenni Rebecca Stephenson. (Originally presented August 31, 2011. Some information may be outdated. Stay tuned for an updated version.)Identifying Resources & Funding Strategies for Artists and Arts Groups 2.0View more PowerPoint from Spacetaker
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Grants: Proposal Writing Short Course

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Courtesy of Foundation Center.org The subject of this short course is proposal writing.  But the proposal does not stand alone. It must be part of a process of planning and of research on, outreach to, and cultivation of potential foundation and corporate donors. This process is grounded in the conviction that a partnership should develop between the nonprofit and the donor. When you spend a great deal of your time seeking money, it is hard to remember that it can also be difficult to give money away. In fact, the dollars contributed by a foundation or corporation have no value until they are attached to solid programs in the nonprofit sector. This truly is an ideal partnership. The nonprofits have the ideas and the capacity to solve problems, but no dollars with which to implement them. The foundations and corporations have the financial resources but not the other resources needed to create programs. Bring the two together effectively, and the result is a dynamic collaboration. You need to follow a step-by-step process in the search for private dollars. It takes time and persistence to succeed. After you have written a proposal, it could take as long as a year to obtain the funds needed to carry it out. And even a perfectly written proposal submitted to the right prospect might be rejected for any number of reasons. Raising funds is an investment in the future. Your aim should be to build a network of foundation and corporate funders, many of which give small gifts on a fairly steady basis and a few of which give large, periodic grants. By doggedly pursuing the various steps of the process, each year you can retain most of your regular supporters and strike a balance with the comings and goings of larger donors. The recommended process is not a formula to be rigidly adhered to. It is a suggested approach that can be adapted to fit the needs of any nonprofit and the peculiarities of each situation. Fundraising is an art as well as a science. You must bring your own creativity to it and remain flexible. Gathering Background InformationThe first thing you will need to do in writing your proposal is to gather the documentation for it. You will require background documentation in three areas: concept, program, and expenses. If all of this information is not readily available to you, determine who will help you gather each type of information. If you are part of a small nonprofit with no staff, a knowledgeable board member will be the logical choice. If you are in a larger agency, there should be program and financial support staff who can help you. Once you know with whom to talk, identify the questions to ask. This data-gathering process makes the actual writing much easier. And by involving other stakeholders in the process, it also helps key people within your agency seriously consider the project's value to the organization. Concept  It is important that you have a good sense of how the project fits with the philosophy and mission of your agency. The need that the proposal is addressing must also be documented. These concepts must be well-articulated in the proposal. Funders want to know that a project reinforces the overall direction of an organization, and they may need to be convinced that the case for the project is compelling. You should collect background data on your organization and on the need to be addressed so that your arguments are well-documented. Program  Here is a check list of the program information you require:the nature of the project and how it will be conducted;the timetable for the project;the anticipated outcomes and how best to evaluate the results; andstaffing and volunteer needs, including deployment of existing staff and new hires. Expenses  You will not be able to pin down all the expenses associated with the project until the program details and timing have been worked out. Thus, the main financial data gathering takes place after the narrative part of the master proposal has been written. However, at this stage you do need to sketch out the broad outlines of the budget to be sure that the costs are in reasonable proportion to the outcomes you anticipate. If it appears that the costs will be prohibitive, even with a foundation grant, you should then scale back your plans or adjust them to remove the least cost-effective expenditures.  Components of a Proposal   Executive Summary: umbrella statement of your case and summary of the entire proposal1 page Statement of Need: why this project is necessary2 pages Project Description: nuts and bolts of how the project will be implemented and evaluated3 pages Budget: financial description of the project plus explanatory notes1 page Organization Information: history and governing structure of the nonprofit; its primary activities,  audiences, and services1 page Conclusion: summary of the proposal's main points2 paragraphs  . . . view more
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