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Art Schools and Degrees Database (Accredited Schools Online)

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Common Artist Misconceptions and Realities: Understanding the Art World Better

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Courtesy of ArtBusiness.com-----After kicking around the art world for three decades now, and during those years talking to countless thousands of artists, gallery owners, and other artland professionals, certain facts and fictions about how everything works gradually become clear. So reflecting back on all that, here's a list of common misconceptions that many artists have, and their corresponding realities...Misconception: "I've got the art. Now all I need are some names and numbers of galleries and collectors who'll be interested in my work and I'll never have any problems selling again.Reality: There is no instant path to success. Way too many artists believe the only obstacle standing between them and greatness is that they've yet to be discovered and that once the "right people" see their work, the world will grasp the gravity of their talent. The truth is that the process of getting known and ultimately recognized is a long game. Only a consistent track record of accomplishments and successes ultimately leads to fame. Just like in any other profession, you start at the beginning, prove yourself over time, and gain a progressively respectable reputation as an artist.Misconception: "My art is unique. Nothing like this has ever been done before.Reality: All art is unique (assuming you're not working in limited editions). The fact that a work of art is unique, or the process used to create a work of art is unique is not enough in and of itself to render that art significant or worthy of notice. Having said that, unusual or unique techniques do count for something, especially if they're highly involved or difficult to duplicate. In the end, though, it's all about the quality, significance and import of the art, not simply that it's different from all other art.Misconception: "My art will sell itself.Reality: No art sells itself. You have to sell it. This doesn't mean hawking it on street corners, but rather engaging in various forms of communication or dialogue around it and demonstrating in various ways that it's worth considering from either aesthetic or intellectual perspectives and even more importantly, worth becoming a part of people's lives. . . . read more at ArtBusiness.com 
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7 Ways to Build A Sustainable Art Career This Year

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Courtesy of hyperallergic.com by Tim Cynova-----2013 might not usher in the sci-fi future of jet packs and personal space travel, but it can be the year when you make solid progress toward turning your artistic hobby or part-time passion into a sustainable career.The staff at Fractured Atlas has compiled a list of practical tips to help you take meaningful immediate steps toward a better future — one where you spend less time worrying about the hurdles that stand in your way and have more time to create your art.At Fractured Atlas, we get artists and their needs because we are artists. Your concerns are truly our concerns. We spend every day helping our network of 250,000 artists from around the country make their artistic dreams a reality by using tools like the ones described below..(1) Practice your networking.Find opportunities to meet new people, expand your professional network, and get recognized by influential players. This includes supporting other people’s art, joining professional associations, organizing a panel discussion, or volunteering at a local arts organization or project. If an Emerging Leader or arts-related Meetup group doesn’t exist in your town around a particular interest, start one. Find a theme and own it. Love bourbon and arts technology projects? Schedule informal gatherings at your favorite bourbon haunt and call the evenings Bourbon for Arts Infrastructure Geeks. Try hard to include people who primarily work outside of the cultural sector. The variety of viewpoints and opinions will make it a more dynamic and interesting group.(2) Be a well-informed arts professional. Expand your knowledge of what’s happening in your desired field by signing up for newsletters, reading industry trades, and searching for applicable studies. Today’s online marketplace of ideas offers a rich selection of food for thought to keep artists intellectually sated. Keep up with the daily industry news at ArtsJournal or other blogs, like Hyperallergic, find out what arts funders are thinking via Grantmakers in the Arts, curl up (virtually, of course) with some cozy arts research studies in the Createquity Arts Policy Library, or expand your horizons and follow a non-arts resource such as Stanford Social Innovation Review. And if all that’s too much, Fractured Atlas’s Culture Flash newsletter offers monthly Geek Alerts for the busy artist . . . read more....Continue reading on hyperallergic.com
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The “Okay, I think I’m ready To Be A Professional Artist,” Checklist

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By Sylvia White, Courtesy of ArtAdvice.com-----“To see far, is one thing…going there is another.”  -Constantin Brancusi Artists who regularly visit this website have acquired a lot of information on how to conduct their business practices. It’s not easy trying to keep track of all the activities necessary to become a working professional artist particularly since most artists are just not suited for the day-to-day practical aspects of running a business.Making art and making an art career are two different things. A lot of artists are already pressed for time, trying to fit their art making into daily lives that already juggle family, work and other commitments. But, each artist needs to understand that when looking at the whole picture of being an artist as a career, the actual art making is only one piece of a very complicated picture. Artists need to be willing to commit at least 30 minutes a day to their career development. What matters is that you are consistent and diligent about devoting this time, without exceptions, to the business of art. Just as financial managers have recognized that the slow steady saver, who puts away $5 per week since birth, is much better off than the 50 year old who starts saving $1000 per month. Your career assets will experience a better growth opportunity if you start early and remain constant.If you need some ideas about how to spend your 30 minutes, try using this checklist as your guide.You have applied for a Business Tax Registration certificate and Sales Tax permit that allows you to purchase supplies wholesale and charge sales tax.You have purchased your domain name (register.com) and established an internet presence. (either your own site or an artists’ co-op site)You have either hired a photographer, or assembled the photographic equipment necessary to properly document your work.You have documented your work with properly labeled slides and organized them in digital files.You have done the necessary research to come up with a target list of places (galleries, museums, consultants) that may be receptive to your work.You have subscribed to relevant art publications such as, ArtCalendar, Artweek, ArtNews, Art in America, etc. and whatever other publications will keep you posted on the activities of the contemporary art world in your community and elsewhere . . . more ... Continue reading on ArtAdvice.com
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