Career

Public Art Resources

Body: 
This list of resources has been put together specifically for attendees of the 2016 Art in Public Spaces info session + panel discussion. If you have any questions please contact Angela@fresharts.orgCall for Artists websitesPublicArtist.org CallForEntry.orgArt Deadline  Fresh Arts OpportunitiesArtist Insurance & Legal ResourcesFractured Atlas Public Art InsuranceFractured Atlas provides Public Art Insurance policies for the fabrication and installation of public artworks. It offers general liability coverage for the artist during the fabrication, installation, and/or the exhibition of the work. You can elect to cover the artwork itself as well.Insurance in the Arts - Virtual Pocket GuidesWelcome to your one stop resource for crash courses in insurance for the arts, specific to the needs of your discipline. Brought to you by Fractured Atlas, a national nonprofit arts service organization, these guides are designed to give you exactly the information you need to help determine the most important types of insurance coverage for you and your organization without being overwhelming.Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Arts Pro-bono ServicesTALA matches low-income artists and small budget arts nonprofits with volunteer attorneys and accountants to assist with arts-related legal and financial matters.Local Organization linksHouston Arts Alliance Civic + Art DesignWeingarten Art GroupMayor's Office of Cultural AffairsFresh Arts Fiscal Sponsorship ProgramTexas Public Art Opps (thanks to our friends at HAA for this list)City of Austin, Art In Public Places Program / Austin, TXCity of San Antonio, Public Art San Antonio / San Antonio, TXCity of San Antonio, Department for Culture & Creative Development / San Antonio, TXCity of Corpus Christi, Public Art Program / Corpus Christi, TXCity of El Paso, Public Art Program / El Paso, TXArts Council of Fort Worth & Tarrant County, Fort Worth Public Art / Fort Worth, TXCity of Dallas, Public Art Program / Dallas, TXTexas Commission on the Arts / TXWhere can you find public art in Houston? (hint: everywhere!)East End Cultural District The Downtown District: Art BlocksMini-Murals ProjectProject Row Houses Rice University Public ArtTrue North / True South / Trail of Art  (Heights Boulevard)University of Houston Public Art collectionWashington Avenue Arts DistrictOnline Readings (recommended by Americans for the Arts)Minding your RFP’s and Q’s by Elizabeth Keithline, ARTSblogCopyrights & Copywrongs: A Quick Overview of Basic Issues by Clark Wiegman, ARTSblogCreating, Collaborating, Connecting with Art, Activism, and the Internet by Xavier Cortada, ARTSblogPublic Art Creates an Elevated Mood by Helen Lessick, ARTSblogGuerilla Tactics, Local Authenticity, and Socially Engaged Artists by Letitia Fernandez Ivins, ARTSblogArtists Evaluating Their Own Public Art by Lajos Heder, ARTSblogChanging Art, Changing Habits by Bill Mackey, ARTSblogWhy Public Art is Good for All Artists by Cathy Breslaw, ARTSblogWorking on a Public Site by Lajos Heder, ARTSblogPublic Art: Reconsidering Site by Cher Knight and Harriet Senie, ARTSblog
Artist Resource Center: 
ARC Categories: 

Business Plan Basics Every Art Business Owner Should Know

Body: 
Courtesy of Neil McKenzie from Creatives and Business LLC-----Why do I need a business plan?Just like an architect needs a plan to turn an idea into reality you need a plan for success in your art business. The main and best reason to develop a business plan is so that you have a blueprint to run and grow your business. Imagine trying to build a house without plan. If you are starting a new art business, a plan will help you organize your thoughts and help you tackle the challenges faced by startup businesses. If your art business is established a plan will help you in building a great team and allow you to focus on your most pressing problems, opportunities and initiatives.A business plan will also be required if you are seeking some type of financing either from a bank or investors. Your plan will show what you intend to accomplish, how you will do it and how much money will be required. More often than not a business will prepare a plan with the sole purpose of getting financing. Your plan is an important tool in the success of your business and should be much more than a document just to raise money.One of the most often overlooked benefits of a business plan is that it forces you to think about your business in new ways! The skills you develop in creating a business plan are universal and transferable to businesses of any kind or size. Perhaps one of the most important benefits of preparing a business plan is that you will start to think strategically, look at the big picture and develop a critical way of thinking about your business.What is a business plan?A business plan is a road map formal (formal in the sense that you should write it down) document where you state the goals, objectives and expected results for your art business. You plan can be very long and detailed or it can be just a few pages – it is really up to you to decide what your art business requires. Developing your business plan will make you think about all of the things that affect your art business and what you intend to do to make your art business a success.Your business plan can be created an internal audience such as yourself and your team and for external audiences such as your bank or investors. You should seriously consider including both audiences in developing the plan for your art business.The basic questions of business planningThe overall idea behind business planning is really very simple if you consider the following four questions:Where are we now?This part of your plan is called a Situation Analysis in that you are trying to get a feel of where you are today and to identify the internal and external factors that affect your business. In answering this question you will be looking at your own strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the marketplace and analyzing your competition.Where are we going?The answer to this question will be wrapped up in your overall mission or vision for your art business as well as the goals and objectives you have developed. You should develop goals for the various business functions such as marketing, finance, creative direction, production and operations, management and organization and your studio and facilities.How are we going to get there?Once your overall goals and objectives have been defined it’s time to develop strategies and the steps required to achieve them. Strategies are generally broad and need to be further broken down into the day to day activities or steps that are needed to accomplish a particular strategy. These steps are commonly called tactics, action plans or action steps. No matter what you call them these are the things that you will do to make your overall mission and goals a reality.How will we know when we have arrived?An important part of the planning process is to track and measure your progress and take corrective action as needed as you move towards accomplishing your goals. This is an ongoing activity that ranges from analyzing your monthly financial statements to reviewing detailed project plans. How do you measure success?Reasons to create a business plan:. . . continue reading at creativesandbusiness.com
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Business Plan Basics For Artists – Goals and Objectives

Body: 
Courtesy of Neil McKenzie from Creatives and Business LLC-----The first few steps in developing a business plan for your art or creative enterprise are to identify your overall direction after careful consideration of you external and internal business environments and capabilities. Before you develop your Goals and Objectives you should have a good feel for your:Mission / VisionValues/ BeliefsInternal Strengths and WeaknessesExternal Opportunities and ThreatsCompetitionYour Products, Customers, and MarketsThe next step in the planning process is to create a framework to accomplish your mission. The process is actually quite simple.Goals  –>  Objectives  –>  Strategies  –>  Action PlansWhat Is A Goal?A goal is a broad term for the things you want to accomplish in your art business. Notice the emphasis on the word “broad”. At this point in developing your plan we are talking generalities. Some of the areas which you will need to develop goals for include:Your art, creative products and servicesExample: My goal is to produce original modern art paintings and begin a line of prints and posters.Your marketsExample: My goal is to start with my local market and then expand to national and international markets.Your brand and reputationExample: My goal is to build a national and then international brand as a top modern art painter.Your financial situation, compensation, and life styleExample: My goal is make a good living with my art and fund my retirement while living the artist lifestyle.Your studio, workshop and facilitiesExample: My goal is to move out of the coop studio and have a studio/gallery of my own in an artist’s section of a major metropolitan areaYour organization, assistants, employeesExample: My goal is to have assistants to help in the studio, run the day to day operations in the gallery and take care of my accounting.What Is An Objective?. . . continue reading at creativesandbusiness.com
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Web Portfolio 101 - The Basics (Columba College)

Body: 
Courtesy of Columbia College from Portfolio Center-----Of all the things a web site may be, a web portfolio is a curated selection of work that provides an overview of your creative experience. It basically tells someone how you want to be understood. A web portfolio can also serve as your main communication hub where the rest of your online presence branches out from.We encourage every student at Columbia to have a web portfolio (yes, that means you, too, ASL and education students!). You don’t have to know how to code, or know what a content management system (CMS) is to make a web portfolio.To get started, you’ll want to get:1. a website hosting system.2. a custom domain name....View complete resource (along with tutorial VIDEO) at Columbia College Portfolio Center website
Artist Resource Center: 

Text Based Portfolios (Columbia College)

Body: 
Courtesy of Colombia College Chicago-----Journalists, arts/entertainment/media managers and marketing/PR reps should not represent themselves with papers and press releases stuffed into a manila folder.  Potential clients and employers expect a professional, organized, and visually appealing representation of your best work.  The following guide will sketch out the elements and organization for a text-based print book.  Samples are provided to demonstrate that text heavy content can be displayed in a visually appealing and accessible way A text based print book should be:ProfessionalOrganizedEasy to navigateEasy to reproduce . . . View entire article with diagrams on Columbia College Portfolio Center website
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Image Based Portfolios (Columbia College)

Body: 
Courtesy of Columbia College Chicago ----- To build an effective, professional portfolio, consider the following:Selection: Your portfolio should reflect your very best projects and the needs and interests of the people you plan to approach for work. Find out what they need to see from you and select work samples that are as close a match as possible. Create new work for your book if you need to. Make it easy for clients to imagine working with you.  Sequence:The common wisdom “start strong- finish strong” plays to the idea that people best remember the first and last images in any given series. You would be wise to be attentive to that strategy but you should also work carefully to create a flow from picture to picture and project to project, beginning to end. The “flow” should take into account the subject matter of an image but also its visual form (line, shape, color). The sequence may seek to weave the images together in a seamless way or might, if appropriate, emphasize differences for a more active and assertive feel . . . view full list with images on the Columbia College Portfolio Center website
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Art Schools and Degrees Database (Accredited Schools Online)

Body: 
Visit Accredited Schools Online: Best Art Schools and Colleges
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Basic Business Skills for Visual Artists (Fresh Arts Presentation 2015)

Body: 
Checklist prepared by Fresh Arts in conjunction with the "Business Skills for Visual Artists" workshop. -----Necessary Basics:-Make sure you have a website. Keep it updated.-Make sure you have an Artist Portfolio.-Make sure you have business cards and you have them with you at all times.-Keep a current contact list of everyone who has come to your shows, purchased your work, or expressed interest in your work. Include mailing address and emails.-Make sure you have high quality images of your work-Have a standard cover letter that you can modify-Have an updated bio, artist statement, and resume that includes: list of exhibitions, gallery representation-Check your email and phone messages regularly and respond promptly-Connect with people on Facebook and Twitter-Create a free artist profile on Fresharts.org and keep your info and artwork currentMore detailed checklist and full list of resources available in the attached Word Document.  Download it below! Workshop Powerpoint Basic Business Skills for Visual Artists from Fresh Arts Fresh Arts periodically presents professional development workshops throughout the year as an essential part of our programming.  If you would like information about future Fresh Arts Workshops, please subscribe to our Artist Resource Newsletter and follow us on Facebook and Twitter
Artist Resource Center: 

Evolving Your Career: Business Skills for Visual Artists (Spacetaker Presentation 2012)

Body: 
Spacetaker presentation led by Houston artist and businessman Taft McWhorter, -----This presentation offers artists tips on how to take their art career to the next level. Business Skills for Visual Artists 2012 from Fresh Arts
ARC Categories: 

How to Write an Artist Statement (Agora Gallery)

Body: 
Courtesy of the Agora Experts from agora-gallery.com-----As a professional artist, you need to have more than your work to get around in the art world. Along with your portfolio, you should have an artist statement available at a moment’s notice. An artist statement should be considered just as important as your works.WHY DO YOU NEED AN ARTIST STATEMENT?An artist statement is most often the front line of communication between an artist and the public. It will be used when you submit your portfolio to competitions, galleries, and museums. It may sometimes be displayed when people are viewing your works in person or on your website. If it’s online, your artist statement will be read by people from all over the world.There are many paths to becoming an artist, through school or an apprenticeship, or through inspiration and self-teaching but no matter how you got there, being a professional artist means that you have to have an artist statement. If you have never written a statement before, or aren’t sure that your current statement is up to art world standards, it can be a quite daunting task to compose one.Luckily, Agora Experts are here to help. Compiling years of experience in the art world, they are more than happy to share what they’ve learned.Here are some valuable tips for writing an artist’s statement: -----...Continue reading on agora-gallery.comImage Credit: Fred Tieken, Artist Statement, 2013 ; Acrylic on Cardboard ; 20" x 20"
ARC Categories: 
Artist Resource Center: 

Pages


PO BOX 66494
Houston, TX 77266-6494


713.868.1839


Fresh Arts |  The Silos at Sawyer 1502 Sawyer St, Studio #103 Houston, TX 77007

Cart